John Graves Simcoe
John Graves Simcoe

Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

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Upcoming Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed. May. 3, 2017
7:30pm
“Toronto's Statue to Queen Elizabeth II”
by Garry Toffoli

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

"Toronto Statue to Queen Elizabeth II" by Garry Toffoli

The Canadian Royal Heritage Trust (CRHT) is the chief organization spearheading and sponsoring The Queen Elizabeth II Blue Sapphire Statue Project, a national initiative to install a distinguished statue of Her Majesty at Queen's Park, the grounds of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in Toronto, Canada.

The go-ahead plan is to unveil the statue in 2017 to commemorate 150 years of Confederation, which coincides with the Queen's 65th year on the throne -- the "blue sapphire" anniversary of Her Majesty's remarkable reign. As Elizabeth II has been our Sovereign for almost half of Canada's entire history since Confederation in 1867, the CRHT Statue Committee believes it makes eminent sense to celebrate these two momentous milestones with a bronze portrait of Her Majesty.

Garry will describe and explain the history behind some of the other statues of royalty in Canada, especially those of the Queen, to put the new statue into historical context, and then discuss this current project.

Garry Toffoli is Vice-Chairman & Executive Director of the Canadian Royal Heritage Trust and a recipient of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee and Golden Jubilee Medals. He is also the Toronto-Hamilton Chairman of the English Speaking Union of Canada and a member of several royalty-related groups, including the Monarchist League of Canada and the Royal Commonwealth Society.

Garry is a co-author of numerous books, including "Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother 1900-2002" and "Royal Tours 1786 - 2010: Home To Canada". His first novel, "Ruritania on the Rideau, was published in 2015.

Garry will be remembered by a number of members as the Founder and Organizer of the Queen's Birthday Parade 1984 to 2003, in which the Gov. Simcoe Branch participated for many years.


Mon June 19, 2016
1:30 PM
"Loyalist Day" at Queen's Park

“Loyalist Day Ceremonies” by Toronto and Gov. Simcoe Branches
Join members and guests at the Guest Flag Pole, Queen's Park for a flag raising celebration of Loyalist Day in Ontario.

More events are being planned to make this Canada 150's Loyalist Day celebration a sensation! Mark your calendar now; join us on this special day.

The program will be followed by a reception within Queen's Park. As people attending the reception have to be pre-registered, please contact Doug Grant loyalist.trails@uelac.org

Recent Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings and Events

Wed., Apr. 5, 2017 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar. 1, 2017
7:30pm
"Loyalists of Toronto" by Richard Fiennes-Clinton

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Loyalists of Toronto" by Richard Fiennes-Clinton

Although the first significant settlement of York (now Toronto) by Europeans began in 1793 with the move of the capital of Upper Canada from Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake), Loyalists played a role.

Richard Fiennes-Clinton has operated an historical walking tour company called "Muddy York Walking Tours" for many years. He is also the recent author of a book on Toronto's early history called "Muddy York - A History of Toronto Until 1834". This presentation will draw on a lot of Richard's research into his published work.


Sat., Feb 11, 2017
Noon for 12:30 potluck
"Women's Fashion and the Great War" by Diane Reid

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Women's Fashion and the Great War" by Diane Reid UE and Sarah Walker

With the 100th Anniversary of the Votes for Women and the Great War, take this World War I fashion and historical journey. The Great War changed forever the ideas and fashion for women. Highlights of fashion from the Gilded age to the Great War will be presented.

See what the clothing looked like not just in photos or on a table, but on models. Displays will add context and additional details. Another sensory dimension - a musical touch - will bring things to life - maybe have you dancing in the aisles!

Diane and Sarah have presented to the branch on former occasions to great acclaim; this one not to be missed.

Diane Reid (member of the Toronto Branch of the UEL) and Sarah Walker, owners of Fashion History Productions, began an association in February 1996. Both of them had a collection of a small number of historical costumes that they were eager to show on live models, to dynamically demonstrate women's clothing in the past.

In subsequent years they undertook to expand their collections of costumes to demonstrate clothing fashions throughout more historical periods to include accessories and undergarments, footwear, wigs and millinery and to include children's and men's wear.

Sarah is a costume maker and Diane does the research and history of the appropriate period. Their collaboration has produced themes that will specifically fit with a theme chosen by the organization's programme. Like the one this afternoon.

2016 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings and Events

Sat., Dec. 17, 2016
12:30pm
Christmas Lunch

At Black Creek Pioneer Village

Christmas Lunch.

Continuing a tradition of several years, Toronto Branch has organized a Christmas Dinner for both branches at Black Creek Pioneer Village, in the Halfway House at 12:30. Parking and admission to the Village are included in the price of the meal. Ticket information will be available here in November.


Wed. Dec 7, 2016
7:30pm
“Roots in Crowland and Norfolk, Ontario”
by Sandy McNamara

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

A presentation about “Strong Roots in Crowland and Norfolk, Ontario” by Sandy McNamara.

Sandy's family has been in Canada since the 1790's. Her direct family name has been acknowledged to be have been in Ontario in the 1770's. An ancestor who she can prove back to is also listed in the same 10 families to have settled in the 1770's in the Welland area. Through these family names, Brookfield, Buchner, Culver, Platt, Woolley and Gilbert to name a few, she can proudly say that her roots are strong indeed. A presentation will show how these families merged, interacted and married.

Sandy McNamara UE is a member of Toronto Branch, UELAC. She graduated from York University, had a working career as a geophysicist and has spent the last 23 years as a stay-at-home mom. Her Grandmother noted “I come from a strong Loyalist stock.” Sandy has followed those generations to discover ancestors who moved from Rhode Island as early settlers of New Jersey, then to New York and on to become founding families along the shores of Lake Erie and of Norfolk County.

Sandra proved to Loyalist Daniel Woolley in 2012 and subsequently to Isaac Gilbert in the same year. An active user of Ancestry, a keen researcher in Facebook, involved in various groups and associations, Sandra likes to help people discover their past. Her latest endeavour is researching “The Declaration of Dependence”.


Wed. Nov 2, 2016
7:30pm
“Edward Marion Chadwick”
by Jonathan Lofft

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

A presentation about “Edward Marion Chadwick (1840-1921)” by Jonathan S. Lofft.

Edward Marion Chadwick (1840-1921), the greatest Canadian of whom you've likely never heard, held the unusual distinction of being an honorary Loyalist. Described as an 'inventor' of the Loyalists, though not himself of Loyalist descent, as commonly understood, Chadwick's involvement indeed dates to beginning of the organised movement late in the nineteenth century, as legal advisor, genealogist, heraldic designer, and adopted Mohawk chief. We shall explore Chadwick's mostly invisible role and his biography with a view to understanding the historical context of the founding of the UELAC.

Jonathan S. Lofft, ThD-candidate is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Fellow in the Faculty of Divinity at Trinity College in the University of Toronto, and an adjunct instructor in the affiliated Toronto School of Theology where he teaches the history of Anglicanism. Jonathan's research informs a dissertation now in preparation entitled A Blessed Word: the Mixed Life of Edward Marion Chadwick ( 1840-1921). Jonathan volunteers as president of the Toronto Branch of the Royal Heraldry Society of Canada, as well as Secretary of the Canadian Church Historical Society.


Wed., Oct. 5, 2016
7:30pm
The Governor and his Lady, by Jean Rae Baxter

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"The Governor and his Lady", by Jean Rae Baxter

All five of Jean Rae Baxter's historical novels have been written in response to the need to tell the story of the Loyalists from the Canadian point of view. It was during her research for the fifth novel, Hope's Journey, set in 1791, that she reread Elizabeth Simcoe's Mrs. Simcoe's Diary. Fascinated by this vivid account of the observations and experiences of Upper Canada's first Lieutenant Governor's wife, Baxter delved more deeply into the remarkable partnership between John Graves Simcoe and Mrs. SImcoe. She was a true child of the Enlightenment, and he a visionary whose reach sometimes exceeded his grasp.

Jean Rae Baxter UE was born in Toronto, but grew up in Hamilton. She holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.Ed degree from Queen's. Jean taught Secondary School English in Lennox & Addington County, Loyalist country west of Kingston.

Ms. Baxter wrote The Way Lies North (2007) in response to the need for responsible historical fiction to tell the story of the Loyalists from a Canadian point of view. The first novel focuses on the plight of ordinary white Loyalists driven from their homes by the violence of the American Revolution. This book was followed by Broken Trail (2011), which tells of the native people's struggle. The third novel, Freedom Bound (2012), deals with the so-called Black Loyalists. However, three novels proved not enough to tell the entire story. In The White Oneida (2014) Baxter examines the issues facing the native people following the American War of Independence as they strove to form a confederacy of their own. The most recent -- Hope's Journey -- is set in 1791 (see the description above).


Mon., August 1, 2015
Simcoe Day
Fort York

Simcoe Day at Fort York

Join us as we celebrate Simcoe Day at Fort York where period military activities focused on the War of 1812 complement our Loyalist period of history.


Friday July 1
Canada Day
Fort York

Canada Day at Fort York

Join us as we celebrate Canada Day at Fort York where period military activities complement our Loyalist period of history.


Sun June 19, 2016
10:30 AM
"Loyalist Day" at Queen's Park

“Loyalist Day Ceremonies” by Toronto and Gov. Simcoe Branches
Join members and guests at the Guest Flag Pole, Queen's Park for a flag raising celebration of Loyalist Day in Ontario.

The program will be followed by a reception within Queen's Park. As people attending the reception have to be pre-registered, please contact Doug Grant loyalist.trails@uelac.org


Wed. May 4, 2016
7:30pm
“Let The Silence Speak”
by Doug Massey, Keith Clark and Lee Claus

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

“Let the Silence Speak” by Doug Massey, Keith Clark and Lee Claus will take the form of a dramatic reading

This is a story of how a disagreement of principle between two men broadens to envelope a third. It’s the time of the American Revolution. Patriot Edward, and Loyalist Benjamin are at each others throats much to the sadness of Little Abraham, an Onkwehonwe, man of the land, original person. When violence rules, those caught in the middle, those who are true neutrals, are just as much the victims of violence as those who use violence for their own ends.

The character Edward is based on research done by Keith Clark on his ancestor, Patriot Edward Lawrence although Keith is also a descendant of Cyphrenus Casselman, a Loyalist. Benjamin is based on research Doug Massey has done on the Loyalists in his family, Benjamin Becraft and his father-in-law Anthony Westbrook. Lee Claus has indigenous roots, and as the historic character, Little Abraham, brings an eloquent, grounding wisdom to the presentation. So among the three readers, the three major groups of the American Revolution are covered!


Wed., Apr. 6, 2016 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed. Mar. 2, 2016
7:30pm
“Ancestors + UELAC Update” by Barb Andrew

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

"My Loyalist Ancestors; UELAC Update" by Barb Andrew, UE, President UELAC
Barb is descended from a colourful array of ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War between the 13 Colonies and Great Britain, among them are:

  • Augustus and James Seeley, who first settled in the Township of Lancaster in 1780 and removed to Elizabethtown in the year 1791.
  • Michael Carman Sr. and Jr. who were both born at Kehl, Germany arrived in Philadelphia about the summer of 1751 and settled in the Mohawk Valley.
  • David Manhard was born in Germantown, New York and many of his 13 issue are buried in the Manhard Cemetery, in Elizabethtown twp., Leeds Co. Ontario.

UELAC Update
The current council members of UELAC have taken on and are overseeing a number of projects that are all geared towards assisting branches and members alike in administration and genealogy research. An update and description of those actions will be provided by Barb.

Barbara J. Andrew UE
Born and raised in Brandon, Barb has always had a great interest in family history and genealogy. She and husband Garry are the proud parents of three married sons and eight grandchildren, all residing in the immediate area.

Polished for Success~Etiquette Coaching , offering etiquette seminars and workshops to children, students and business clients, is the business Barb founded ten years ago, prior to retiring from a career as an office administrator.

Currently serving in the capacity of President of the UELAC, Treasurer of the Board of Directors of Brandon General Museum & Archives, Treasurer of the Westman Scottish Association and Second VP & Membership Chair of Brandon Branch #003 Royal Canadian Legion, life can sometimes get a bit hectic. A past president of the Manitoba Branch UELAC and a life long volunteer she has served the community in numerous not for profit organizations.


Sat. Feb. 13, 2016
12:00 noon
"The Queen's Beasts"
by David Rumball
St. David's Church,
49 Donlands Ave.

“The Queen's Beasts” by David Rumball
This presentation on the ten Queen's Beasts will cover the concept through development of the statues of the ten mythological beasts that were made for the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, and were at Westminster Abbey for that ceremony. The Beasts now reside in Ottawa, where our speaker rediscovered them in 2009 after many years of absence and had been lost to the collective memory of heraldists and monarchists everywhere..

Captain David Rumball CD, MA, UE, LRHSC, FRHSC(Hon), OLJ resides in Peterborough. David served in the military 1982-2000 Canadian Forces Primary Reserves. He is a graduate of Trent University (1984, Honours Bachelor of Arts) and of the American Military University in Virginia (2000, Masters of Arts in History). From 2009 through 2014, he was an Aide-de-Camp to His Honour the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, and in 2009 was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Heraldry Society of Canada, of which he is now the immediate past president. A man of many interests, David will share one of those, The Queen's Beasts, with us.

2015 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings and Events

Wed. Dec. 2, 2015
7:30pm
“Notable Moments at Christmas”
by Garry Toffoli

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

"Canadian Historical Moments in the Christmas Season" by Garry Toffoli

The list of special moments and events in Canada's history is long and have collectively contributed to weave our Canadian fabric. Now that the Christmas and year-end / year-beginning season is upon us, Garry will review some of the special moments which have occurred during this special time of the year.

Garry Toffoli is a life member of the Monarchist League of Canada and a recipient of their Gold Badge of Service, also a recipient of the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. He is a member of several royalty-related groups, and is Executive Director of the Canadian Royal Heritage Trust.

Garry is a co-author of numerous books, including "Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother 1900-2002" and "Lives of the Princesses of Wales".

Garry will be remembered by a number of members as the Founder and Organizer of the Queen's Birthday Parade 1984 to 2003, in which the Gov. Simcoe Branch participated for many years.


Wed. Nov. 4, 2015
7:30pm
“An Author's Journey”
by Elaine Cougler

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

"An Author's Journey: How My Writing Journey Helped Me Discover My Own Genealogy" by Elaine Cougler.

By the time Elaine has the Loyalist trilogy finished, she'll have been working it and her personal history for almost 10 years. (Fall, 2016) This talk will show how her own background eventually enriched her historical fiction as she discovered more and more personal links. Of course the novels are NOT her story.

An awakening of interest in our history on the part of many Canadians has been sparked by the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812; taking part in various events and discovering her heritage along with her friends and neighbours was thrilling. She is delighted to bring that excitement to her audience at the UEL group named for the illustrious Lieutenant Governor Simcoe.

Elaine Cougler: Born and raised in the heart of Southwestern Ontario's dairy country, Elaine is a graduate of Western University and a former high school teacher. She taught French, English and Computer Studies at various schools across the province.

Writing is Elaine's pleasure and her obsession. She has written two books of family memories, a cookbook, a children's book, and her two historical novels: The Loyalist's Wife, which was published in June of 2013, and the sequel, The Loyalist's Luck, launched in October, 2014. She is currently working on the third in the Loyalist trilogy, The Loyalist Legacy. The Loyalist's Wife was a finalist in the Inspire! Toronto International Book Fair's Self-Publishing Awards and Elaine is a recipient of the Writers Community of Durham Region Pay-It-Forward Award.

A lover of people and especially writers, Elaine delights in speaking to groups large and small. Her teaching skills make her a natural at leading workshops on writing. On Becoming a Wordsmith is Elaine's writing blog where she writes about the journey to publication and beyond.


Wed., Oct 7, 2015
7:30pm
“Tory Vengeance?”by Tim Compeau

St. David's Towers Community Room,
51 Donlands Ave.

"Tory Vengeance?: Honour, Propaganda, and the Loyalist 'Black Legend' in the American Revolution" by Tim Compeau.

The patriot press described the loyalists of the American Revolution as fiendish, bloodthirsty monsters, who were transformed by their desire for revenge from fellow Americans into the very worst enemies of liberty. This reputation clung to the loyalists in popular American histories, novels, and films ever since.

How much truth is there in the propaganda? What did the loyalists and the British commanders say about the allegations? What was the line between "retributive justice" and bloody revenge against the patriots?

In this presentation, Tim Compeau will explore how loyalists dealt with the conflicting demands of honour, Christian duty, and revenge, and how the patriot media was so successful in creating a consistent and lasting image of Tory cruelty.

Tim Compeau received his Honours BA from Queen's University in 2004. In 2006 he graduated from the University of Western Ontario with an MA in Public History. In 2010 Tim received his PhD at the University of Western Ontario, and and has been the recipient of the United Empire Loyalist Scholarship.

Entitled “Dishonoured Americans: Loyalist Manhood and Political Death in Revolutionary North America,” my dissertation explores the careers of loyalists who either considered themselves, or were considered by others, to be "gentlemen." The final section of the dissertation explores the importance of honour in the loyalists' self-perception, their official claims on the British government for compensation, and their political rebirth in Canada as they attempted to restore their privileged status with Britain's help. Loyalist honour has been described by American historians as being submissive and deferential, but I argue that it was in fact as assertive and demanding as the patriot concepts of manhood formed in the American Revolution.


Sat., July 18, 2015
all day
Annual bus trip - to Northumberland County and Quinte

Annual bus trip - to Northumberland County and Quinte
Our annual Gov. Simcoe Branch bus trip will this year interesting sites and people between Cobourg and Trenton. Once again our favourite tour leader, Peter Brotherhood, will be our organizer and guide.

See the flyer for details on the itinerary, sites to visit, and costs. To register, or with any questions, contact Doug Grant at loyalist.trails@uelac.org.


Mon., August 3, 2015
Simcoe Day
Fort York

Simcoe Day at Fort York

Join us as we celebrate Simcoe Day at Fort York where period military activities focused on the War of 1812 Bicentennial complement our Loyalist period of history.


Fri June 19, 2015
10:00 AM
"Loyalist Day" at Queen's Park

“Loyalist Day Ceremonies” by Toronto and Gov. Simcoe Branches
Join members and guests at the Guest Flag Pole, Queen's Park for a flag raising celebration of Loyalist Day in Ontario. (More details to come.)


Wed., May. 6, 2015
7:30pm
"Wallace House" by Ken Maynard

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

“Historical Wallace House in Woodbridge” by Ken Maynard
This house was built by Captain Nathaneal Wallace who came from Ireland with his wife in 1837 and settled in Burrwick (later changed to Woodbridge) Ontario. Both the Burwick home (at some point in time, the 2nd "r" was dropped) and the Tinsmith house from Woodbridge are now at Black Creek Pioneer Village.

Captain Wallace was a prominent business man in Woodbridge and so were his sons. One son went into politics and was a cabinet minister under four Prime Ministers.

(More details to come.)


Wed., Apr. 1, 2015 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar. 4, 2015
7:30pm
Memories in the GTA,
by Dave Cook

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

“Memories in the GTA” by Dave Cook
Dave will discuss many of the stories from his books. Topics range from sports to royalty. All stories originated in the western areas of the GTA. Many of the topics are of international significance known the world over but took place in the Milton, Mississauga, Port Credit and Etobicoke areas.

He will talk about the Last Grand Duchess of Russia, the Lancaster Bomber, AVRO Arrow and Flying Saucer. I will describe Franklin Roosevelt's top secret train trip with his war cabinet through Niagara, Hamilton, Mississauga, Etobicoke and on to Manitoulin Island and then what took place there that resulted in a military tribunal.

Other topics include how Gordon Sinclair's radio broadcast caught the attention of President Reagan; the establishment of the first Workmen's Compensation Hospital; William Pearce Howland, the only U.S. born Father of Canadian Federation; Laura Secord's father Thomas Ingersoll and the 1805 land treaty in Toronto Township; and Canada's first Four Leaf Clover traffic interchange. There will be time for question and answers.

For many of us, this will be like the golden oldies, things we heard about or even lived through.

Dave Cook and His family lived near the Junction area of Toronto in the 1940s before they moved to establish a farm on the 6th Line, south of the Village of Malton. As a youngster attended Elmbank Public School and Malton Public School. In 1957, his family homestead was expropriated by the Federal Government as part of the Toronto Airport expansion The family then moved to Applewood Acres in south Mississauga.

In 1966 he was hired by CHIC Radio in Brampton and later accepted a job in the lucrative Toronto market at CHIN Radio. He was employed as an on-air news announcer.

He left radio in 1974 to work as a newspaper reporter with the Mississauga News and later, its sister publication, the Etobicoke Gazette.

In 1980 he was elected Councillor, City of Mississauga and Regional Municipality of Peel. He served three terms and retired in 1988.

After retiring from Council, Dave's lifelong hobby in motorsports led him into a new career as he accepted a job as general manager of Mosport International Speedway. When the race track was sold to a U.S. promoter he retired from motorsport and turned his attention to writing and publishing books on community history. Dave was presented with the Heritage Mississauga Foundation Award in 2009 and two years later was named a Paul Harris Fellow of Rotary International.


Sat., Sat Feb 14, 2015
12:00 noon
"Black Loyalists of New Jersey" by Brian Carver
and potluck luncheon
At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

“A Sense of Their Own Capacity: Colonel Tye and the Black Loyalists of New Jersey” by Brian Carver
The Crown had a secret weapon in New Jersey: The Black Loyalists. Unfortunately for the war and the future history of North America, they failed to make full use of this weapon.

Brian will note the deeds and adventures of the notorious partisan Titus Cornelius, AKA "Colonel Tye", who wreaked havoc on the Patriots of New Jersey between 1778-1780. He will discuss the origins of the Black Loyalists beginning with Lord Dunmore's Proclamation in 1775 and continuing through to the evacuation of New York.

Loyalist William Franklin attempted to organize Colonel Tye's Black guerrillas and other New Jersey Loyalists into an irregular force to "distress the enemy in any quarter". Why did the Royal government resist these efforts and what could have happened if they had embraced Franklin's plans?

Don't miss this exciting presentation on a little known facet of the American Revolution.


Sat., Jan. 17, 2015
2:00pm
"Loyalist Decade and an English Canadian identity" by Charles Pachter

At Moose Factory
22 Grange Ave., Toronto

“How the Loyalist Decade (1783-1793) kickstarted an English Canadian identity” – a presentation by artist Charles Pachter.

This is the story of a calamitous period in North American history which gave birth to a diverse society of people known collectively today as English Canadians. And while some of what I am about to relate may be vaguely recollected by some of you, for the most part the symbolic and national importance of this story has been neglected by our educators and thus unappreciated by newer generations of Canadians, especially school children, for whom it could well be the most inspirational and thought-provoking subject.

Ten years ago while browsing in a used book store, I purchased a set of volumes of the letters of John Graves Simcoe and a copy of Elizabeth Simcoe's diary. Whenever daily contemporary situations seemed trivial or uninspiring, I turned to these letters and diaries of 200 years ago and immersed myself in the events which took place here that gave birth to the city-state we call Toronto.

The more I read, the more I was fascinated by the political power struggles and population shifts which resulted in the birth of English Canada and, in no small part, determined its future character.

Mr Pachter's presentation will build from this base.

ONE of Canada's leading contemporary artists, Charles Pachter is a painter, printmaker, sculptor, designer, historian, and lecturer.

He spearheaded Toronto's Queen Street West revival in the 1970s and 80s by restoring 20 old buildings into facilities for arts usage.

He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Chevalier of France's Order of Arts and Letters, holds honorary doctorates from Brock University, OCAD University, and the University of Toronto where he is a Senior Fellow at Massey College. He is a recipient of the Queen's Golden and Diamond Jubilee medals.

His images of the queen, moose, and maple leaf flag are icons of Canadian contemporary art. McClelland & Stewart publications include an illustrated book on his life and work, and The Journals of Susanna Moodie, his celebrated collaboration with poet Margaret Atwood. His murals of Hockey Knights in Canada can be seen in Toronto's College Subway Station.

Mr. Pachter lives and works in downtown Toronto in an award-winning studio designed by Canadian architect Stephen Teeple. His work is on permanent display in his adjoining Moose Factory Gallery.

His paintings are in the Portrait Gallery of Canada, the Canadian Embassy in Washington, Canada House in London, the Parliament Buildings, the Prime Minister's residence, and the Embassy of France in Ottawa.

Pachter's steel and granite moose sculptures have been installed across Canada. His best selling children's books, M is for Moose, and Canada Counts, are published by Cormorant Books, Toronto.

2014 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings and Events

Sat., Dec. 13, 2014
12:30pm
Christmas Lunch

At Black Creek Pioneer Village

Christmas Lunch.

Continuing a tradition of several years, Toronto Branch has organized a Christmas Dinner for both branches at Black Creek Pioneer Village, in the Halfway House at 12:30. Parking and admission to the Village are included in the price of the meal. To request and pay for a ticket please complete this form and mail to Toronto Branch.


Wed., Dec. 3, 2014
7:30pm
"1812: The Land Between Flowing Waters" by Ken Leland

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"1812: The Land Between Flowing Waters", a book by author Ken Leland.

The novel is set on the Niagara and Detroit River frontiers during the War of 1812. In Upper Canada the Benjamins found freedom from slavery. With their white neighbours and friends, the Lockwoods, both families must defend a new homeland from impending American invasion. These families are Loyalists, living near Niagara Falls. The Babcocks are pacifist Quakers, yet they too are threatened by the coming onslaught. For Kshiwe, Kmonokwe and their children, 1812 is just another season of fear among First Nations. This Neshnabek family lives many days travel to the west, in a place settlers call Indiana. In the shadows of Brock and Tecumseh, all join in the struggle to endure.

The author thinks of Upper Canada in the early 19th century as a shelter for people who were radically oppressed; as a sanctuary for Loyalists, a refuge for enslaved Blacks, a safe haven from genocide for First Nation families. The history of the Society of Friends indicates that Quakers also came north at this time, first because they were welcomed, but more importantly, because many Quakers were fleeing spectres of intolerance, slavery and genocide, not for themselves of course, but for others in the society in which they lived.

Research for his debut novel, 1812, led to another most surprising conclusion. The further Leland delved, the more similarities he found in Quaker and First Nations societies, particularly in terms of gender equality in social roles and spirituality, in a person's relationship with the Master of Life. Although details varied, the cores seemed essentially the same. In 1812, Leland tried to show some of those similarities in his Quaker and First Nation family narratives, but there is, of course, one tremendous and obvious difference, Friends did not face government sponsored, systematic extermination.

The author has retired from careers in academic publishing and teaching, only to find himself in a third career as a full time novelist. At the present time, he is in final stages of writing a second novel based on the lives of the same families found in 1812.


Wed., Nov. 5, 2014
7:30pm
Joseph Brant and Dartmouth College, by Jean Rae Baxter

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"The Education of a Leader: Joseph Brant and the School that Became Dartmouth College", by Jean Rae Baxter
When Joseph Brant was eighteen years old, Sir William Johnson, who was married by Mohawk rites to Joseph's sister Molly, sent him to the Moor Indian Charity School in Lebanon, Connecticut. This school was established by the Rev'd Eleazar Wheelock, an evangelical Protestant minister, in order to further his grand design, defined as, "A plan for introducing Religion, Learning, Agriculture and Manufactures Among the Savages in America." This school, which had much in common with the disastrous residential schools of the 2oth century, had as its chief purpose the training of young natives to serve as missionaries to their own people.

Why did Sir William choose this school for his young protégée? Why did he remove him from it and make other arrangements for his education? And how did the Moor School evolve over just two decades to become Dartmouth College, to which, in 1780, Joseph Brant sent his own teen-age sons, Joseph Jr. and Jacob?

Jean Rae Baxter UE was born in Toronto, but grew up in Hamilton. She holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.Ed degree from Queen's. She taught Secondary School English in Lennox & Addington County, Loyalist country west of Kingston.

She wrote The Way Lies North (2007) in response to the need for responsible historical fiction to tell the story of the Loyalists from a Canadian point of view. The first novel in the trilogy focuses on the plight of ordinary white Loyalists driven from their homes by the violence of the American Revolution. This book was followed by Broken Trail (2011), which tells of the native people's struggle. The third novel, Freedom Bound (2012), deals with the so-called Black Loyalists. However, three novels proved not enough to tell the entire story. In The White Oneida (2014) Baxter examines the issues facing the native people following the American War of Independence as they strove to form a confederacy of their own.


Sun., Oct. 26, 2014
2:00pm
"History, Heroes, and Hope" by Bonnie Schepers

At Toronto Branch
40 Scollard St

"History, Heroes, and Hope", by Bonnie Schepers

Gather before or stay after the meeting to make use of the library, enjoy tea and cookies, or both.

Bonnie is the current President of UELAC, and has managed visits to most if not all branches across the country since taking the position in June 2013. This year, 2014, the Association celebrates its centenary.

Bonnie will be taking us back to 1914 to ask the questions - How have we (UELAC) changed? How have we stayed the same? The topic speaks specifically to our 100 year anniversary and to the future of UELAC and why what we do matters.

Bonnie's introduction to the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada came in 1998 when she began the research necessary to apply for a UELAC Certificate of Loyalist lineage. In 2000, she was the first to receive a UE certificate as a descendant of Loyalist Abraham Pastorius. Further exploration into her genealogy led to contacts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where the North American roots of the Pastorius family are found.

Bonnie is a graduate of the University of Windsor with a B.A. degree in Social Science. Her active involvement with UELAC began when she was recruited as branch Secretary at her first Bicentennial Branch meeting in 1999. She is currently President of UELAC. Bonnie lives in Windsor, Ontario with her husband Albert, a consulting engineer. They have two children, a son who is an ESL Instructor in Tenerife, Canary Islands and a married daughter, employed as Communications Director at POLIS Water Sustainability Project at the University of Victoria, B.C.


Wed., Oct. 1, 2014
7:30pm
"Loyalist Refugees" by Gavin Watt

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Loyalist Refugees - Non-Military Refugees in Quebec 1776-1784" by Gavin Watt, who will discuss his latest book.
Soldiers did not come alone. In the past, wives, mothers, fathers, grandparents, sisters, brothers and children of the fighting men have been given secondary treatment. In Loyalist Refugees, they are the subjects of a study describing the systematic persecution that forced so many to seek refuge in Quebec. How these unfortunate people were housed, fed, clothed and employed is examined, as is their desperate unhappiness and discontent.

This book identifies and lists details for more than 2,000 non-military loyalist refugees who sheltered in lower Quebec during the American Revolution—pointing researchers to crucial primary and secondary sources in Canada, the USA, and the UK. Many if not most of these refugees migrated to places across British North America and beyond, after their period of sanctuary in Quebec.

Gavin Watt, a resident of the Toronto area has been retired from his working career for nearly ten years, but will likely never retire form his avocation, military history. He is the founder, and was President, of the Museum of Applied Military History from 1977-2007. But to those of us with Loyalist interests, his presence has been keenly appreciated. Gavin is the founder, and was Officer Commanding, of the recreated King's Royal Yorkers from 1975-2006, a unit with which he continues his valued involvement. Perhaps to a much broader audience of historically interested readers, Gavin has researched extensively the military actions and people of the American Revolution, and authored or co-authored several books, including "The Burning of the Valleys, Daring Raids Against the New York Frontier in the Fall of 1780", "The Flockey — 13 August 1777 — The Defeat of the Tory uprising in the Schoharie Valley" and "Rebellion in the Mohawk Valley — The St. Leger Expedition of 1777" which was selected by Books on Canada 2003 for History as an example of "best writing and research".

Gavin's passion for military research is evident in his contributions as Honorary Vice-President of the UELAC, and his enthusiastic presentations - don't miss it.


Wed., Sept. 17, 2014
7:30pm
"Shadows In The Tree" by Jennifer DeBruin

At Toronto Branch
40 Scollard St

Gather after 7:00 when you make use of the library or enjoy tea and cookies, or both.

The featured guest speaker is Jennifer DeBruin, a member of St. Lawrence Branch and a recent recipient of her first Loyalist Certificate. She will talk about her experiences around her second and recent book, Shadows In The Tree, published January 2013:

Engulfed in the American Revolution, the United Empire Loyalists are compelled to abandon their homes and flee to the king's lands in Quebec. Stepping from the shadows of her husband's life, Maria Catrina Eamer, alone in safeguarding her children on their exodus through the wild, untamed Adirondack Mountains reveals the true price paid for loyalty.

In this 100th Anniversary year of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada (UELAC), Shadows in the Tree by Jennifer DeBruin UE (176 pp., $20.00), recently released by General Store Publishing House, Renfrew, ON, immerses the reader in the experience of the Eamer family, living amidst the unrivalled beauty and abundance of the Mohawk Valley, now engulfed in the fight for liberty. In choosing loyalty to the king, Peter Eamer is marked a traitor forcing him to flee his impending arrest. The impossible choice, once made, compelled them to abandon the land they loved and the hope they would find peace amongst their once-loved neighbours, friends and...family.

Peter's wife Maria Catrina and their young children are left upon the homestead to await rescue by unknown guides who will lead them to the safety of Quebec. Their exodus reveals the darkness of men's hearts and the lengths to which a mother will go to safeguard her precious ones.

Exploring the human story within the exodus of the United Empire Loyalists from the colonies during the American Revolution to their settlement along the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario and beyond, DeBruin engages the reader in a time deemed by some as the "first civil war." This fact-based/historical fiction makes the connection between the North American conflict that precipitated this mass exodus, estimated at about 70,000 colonists1, to the re-settlement of those refugees in Canada's eastern regions (including: the Maritimes and Quebec/Lower Canada) but particularly in Ontario/Upper Canada. A personal and heartwrenching account, this novel has garnered early interest from readers across Canada and the US.


Wed., May. 7, 2014
7:30pm
KRRNY and The Royal Yorkers, by Gavin Watt, Brian Carver and Chris Armstrong

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

KRRNY and The Royal Yorkers, by Gavin Watt, Brian Carver and Chris Armstrong
Gavin will discuss the wartime history of the KRRNY and their role in the settlement of Ontario, with a special emphasis on the daily lives of the soldiers. Brian will expand on this with a discussion of his uniform and kit, followed by a lively demonstration of the basic drill from the 1764 British Manual of Arms.

Chris Armstrong is a musketman in the recreated Royal Yorkers. A graphic designer by trade, he is responsible for the regimental newsletter The Yorker Courant and has assisted Gavin Watt with the visuals for his books. Chris is the descendant of two Nova Scotia loyalist families. He has a deep interest in military history and has done amateur research into Loyalist military units, focusing on Adam's Rangers.

Brian Carver has been a proud Royal Yorker since 2008, and recently joined our branch. He is the Executive Director of Octavia Films: A Nonprofit for Women, and moved to Toronto from San Francisco, California in 2008. He has been an avid Revolutionary War buff since childhood and was happy to finally arrive in Canada, even if it was 230 years later than his fellow King's men and women!

Gavin Watt, a resident of the Toronto area has been retired from his working career for nearly ten years, but will likely never retire form his avocation, military history. He is the founder, and was President, of the Museum of Applied Military History from 1977-2007. But to those of us with Loyalist interests, his presence has been keenly appreciated. Gavin is the founder, and was Officer Commanding, of the recreated King's Royal Yorkers from 1975-2006, a unit with which he continues his valued involvement. Perhaps to a much broader audience of historically interested readers, Gavin has researched extensively the military actions and people of the American Revolution, and authoured or co-authoured several books, including "The Burning of the Valleys, Daring Raids Against the New York Frontier in the Fall of 1780", "The Flockey — 13 August 1777 — The Defeat of the Tory uprising in the Schoharie Valley" and "Rebellion in the Mohawk Valley — The St. Leger Expedition of 1777" which was selected by Books on Canada 2003 for History as an example of "best writing and research".

Gavin's passion for military research is evident in his contributions as Honorary Vice-President of the UELAC, and his enthusiastic presentations - don't miss it.


Wed., Apr. 2, 2014 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar. 5, 2014
7:30pm
Loyalist Search and Rescue, by Bonnie Schepers

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

Loyalist Search and Rescue - It's What We Do, by Bonnie Schepers
In October of 2008, Bonnie had the opportunity to explore an original 1696 manuscript in the rare book room of the University of Pennsylvania's Van Pelt Library. Today this manuscript, written by Francis Daniel Pastorius, is being studied by world scholars for its valuable recording of early colonial life in America. Bonnie's interest in this collection of several hundred folio pages is a personal one. On faded ink-stained pages, within the more than two thousand individual entries, she found her family genealogy.

In presenting the story of her search for the forgotten son, Bonnie hopes that others will feel the same desire to bring to light the struggles and accomplishments woven into their own family history. The United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada is an organization that supports and encourages the preservation and telling of stories just like this one.

Bonnie Schepers' introduction to the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada came in 1998 when she began the research necessary to apply for a UELAC Certificate of Loyalist lineage. In 2000, she was the first to receive a UE certificate as a descendant of Loyalist Abraham Pastorius. Further exploration into her genealogy led to contacts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where the North American roots of the Pastorius family are found. Bonnie hopes one day to write the remarkable story of her Germantown ancestry.

Bonnie is a graduate of the University of Windsor with a B.A. degree in Social Science. Her active involvement with UELAC began almost immediately when she was recruited as branch Secretary at her first-ever Bicentennial Branch meeting. She is currently President of UELAC. Bonnie lives in Windsor with her husband Albert, a consulting engineer. They have two children, a son who is a software engineer currently in India, and a married daughter, employed as Communications Director at POLIS Water Sustainability Project at the University of Victoria, B.C.


Sat., Feb 8, 2014
Noon for 12:30 potluck
Women's Clothing of 1812-14 by Diane Reid

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"What the Well-dressed Women wore during the War years 1812-1814" by Diane Reid UE and Sarah Walker

Fashion styles that were worn depended on what side of the war you were on and accessories that all women would have possessed to enhance there style.

The fashions will cover the time period leading up to the war, and the changes that occurred in fashion because of and during the war.

There will be demonstration of spinning and hand needle crafts, embroidery, and knitting.

Diane Reid (member of the Toronto Branch of the UEL) and Sarah Walker, owners of Fashion History Productions, began an association in February 1996. Both of them had a collection of a small number of historical costumes that they were eager to show on live models, to dynamically demonstrate women's clothing in the past.

In subsequent years they undertook to expand their collections of costumes to demonstrate clothing fashions throughout more historical periods to include accessories and undergarments, footwear, wigs and millinery and to include children's and men's wear.

Sarah is a costume maker and Diane does the research and history of the appropriate period. Their collaboration has produced themes that will specifically fit with a theme chosen by the organization's programme. Like the one this afternoon.

2013 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed., Dec. 4, 2013
7:30pm
Jane Austen, Without The Zombies, by Paul Federico

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Jane Austen, Without The Zombies", by Paul Federico
The life and times of the Napoleonic War/War of 1812 as reflected in Jane Austen's writings and life, her society and her family. A pastiche of the history of the period from her brothers, heroes of the Navy, to her views on the Regency period and not a zombie in sight.

Paul Federico – military historian, writer, researcher. Paul has lectured extensively on the early conflicts in North America, advised on film and television projects, acted as a consultant to many school boards on curriculum development on Canadian history, designed and mounted exhibits for a number of museums and historic sites and generally made a nuisance of himself internationally. He is currently the Executive Director of the Toronto Military History Foundation, President of the Toronto Historical Association and Chair of the Costume Society of Ontario.


Wed., Nov. 6, 2013
7:30pm
Freedom Bound, by Jean Rae Baxter

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Freedom Bound", by Jean Rae Baxter
Jean Rae Baxter's presentation is based on her research for the novel Freedom Bound, which shows the experience of the so-called Black Loyalists who gained their freedom through the support they gave to the British during the American Revolution. Their passport to freedom was the "General Birch Certificate," awarded not just to escaped slaves who served in the Black Dragoons and the Black Pioneers, but also to men and women who performed such humbler roles as cook and stable hand.

Although abolitionists were active at the time of the American Revolution, slavery was widely accepted as an institution. The slave trade was stopped in 1807, but it was not until 1833 that slavery itself was abolished throughout the British Empire (It had been ended earlier in Upper Canada.)

It was basically as a stratagem for upsetting the economy of the rebelling Southern Colonies that Britain offered slaves a chance at freedom, introducing it without sufficient forethought to its implications.

Thousands of runaway slaves flocked behind British lines. Few knew which side their owner was on. All they heard was "Freedom." The problem was, only slaves owned by rebels qualified for a General Birch Certificate. If the owner was a Loyalist, his slaves were sent right back to him.

To introduce a further complication, during the British occupation of Charleston (1780-1782) General Sir Henry Clinton, the British Commander in Chief, issued a proclamation offering full restoration of property and civil rights to all rebels who would swear allegiance to King George. In Charleston alone, more than two thousand accepted the offer. "Now that we've returned to our allegiance," they said, "kindly give us back our slaves." But that was not possible; the genie was out of the bottle.

This situation forms part of the background for Jean's presentation, which focuses upon the institution of slavery during the period of the American Revolution.

Jean Rae Baxter UE was born in Toronto, but grew up in Hamilton. She holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.Ed degree from Queen's. She taught Secondary School English in Lennox & Addington County, Loyalist country west of Kingston.

She wrote The Way Lies North (2007), the first novel in her Young Adult Loyalist trilogy, in response to the need for responsible historical fiction to tell the story of the Loyalists from a Canadian point of view. Its focus was the plight of ordinary white Loyalists driven from their homes by the violence of the American Revolution. This book was followed by Broken Trail (2011), which told of the native people's struggle. The trilogy concludes with Freedom Bound (2012), the story of the so-called Black Loyalists.


Wed., Oct. 2, 2013
7:30pm
"Ancestors & Applications" and "Loyalist Lady" by Jo Ann Tuskin

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Ancestors & Applications" and "Loyalist Lady" by Jo Ann Tuskin
Jo Ann has completed a new project for Gov. Simcoe Branch and has created an inventory list of all the Loyalist certificate applications on file with the Branch. From that we now have the "Ancestors & Applications List" that Jo Ann will present and explain at the meeting. This list will be posted to the Gov. Simcoe Branch website. If you submitted one of these applications, you may add your name to the list as well.
Following that, Jo Ann will give her 'Loyalist Lady' presentation, outlining: Who & Where & Why; Migration & Settlement; and her Loyalist family's journey.

Jo Ann Tuskin is the secretary of the Gov. Simcoe Branch, and also of the UELAC. She has undertaken a number of projects for both groups. Jo Ann, a retired teacher, does numerous presentations about The Loyalists to school classes and others.


Wed., May. 1, 2013
7:30pm
Everyday Life in Upper Canada, 1812–1814, by Dorothy Duncan

At St. David's Towers Community Room
51 Donlands Ave.

"Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst:
Everyday Life in Upper Canada, 1812–1814" by Dorothy Duncan.

Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst explores the web of human relationships that developed in Upper Canada following the American Revolution, in the years leading up to the War of 1812, and during the conflict that raged for two years between the young United States and Britain, its former master. The book focuses on the families, homes, gardens, farms, roads, villages, towns, shops, and fabric of everyday life in this frontier society. Upper Canada was a land in transition as First Nations, fur traders, Loyalists, entrepreneurs, merchants, farmers, and newcomers from every walk of life formed alliances and partnerships based on friendship, marriage, respect, religion, proximity, and the desire to survive and prosper. With the declaration of war in June 1812, Upper Canadians realized that not only their lives but their future peace and prosperity were threatened. They responded with perseverance, loyalty, and unexpected acts of bravery.

Dorothy Duncan: has addressed our branch on several occasions and often provided us with advice as well. She has always been involved with history in the form of museums, restorations and especially interpretation of the past. She has been curator of Black Creek Pioneer Village, and latterly Executive Director of OHS. Retired since Jan. of 2002, she is involved with Cuisine Canada and the Jane Austen Society. Dorothy has received the Order of Ontario, and an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from University of Waterloo. She is a Fellow of the Canadian Museum Association, and was named Woman of the Year by the Toronto Women's Culinary Network for 2004.


Wed., Apr. 3, 2013 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar. 6, 2013
7:30pm
“Social Dance in Loyalist Times”
by Karen Millyard
At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"The Astonishing and Curious History of Social Dance in Loyalist Times" by Karen Millyard

In a lively, illustrated talk, dance historian Karen Millyard will share with us the surprising facts and fascinating details about the pervasiveness of dance in social life (both civilian and military) during the Loyalist period. Using period newspapers, diaries, letters, drawings and other sources, she will introduce us to the significance of dancing in the lives and world of the Loyalist settlers. She will also teach a very simple dance or two (no experience required whatsoever; no lead or follow) and will gladly answer any and all questions.

Karen Millyard, a dance historian and an MA student in Dance Studies at York University in Toronto, specializes in the social dance of the 18th and early 19th centuries. Millyard co-created the conference English Country Dancing: Rooted in the Past, Dancing into the Future. A teacher and consultant, she works in museums, heritage sites, schools and the community as well as leading workshops and balls to bring the dances of the past to the general public of today.


Sat. Feb. 9, 2013
Noon for 12:30 potluck
St David's Towers,
Community Room,
51 Donlands.
“Those Left Behind”
by Janice Nickerson

"Those Left Behind: Widows and Orphans of the War of 1812" by Janice Nickerson.

When Upper Canada Militia men died in the War of 1812, what happened to their wives and children? Professional genealogist and published author, Janice Nickerson will discuss the fallout of this conflict from the perspective of the families left behind. Case studies will draw on her book York's Sacrifice: Militia Casualties and the War of 1812.

Janice Nickerson: Family history research has been my passion for over 25 years. In my spare time I pored through books in libraries, squinted at microfilm in archives and wrote letters to ever increasing numbers of relatives. In university, my research projects invariably focused on some aspect of my family's history!

After studying anthropology in graduate school, I decided to make genealogy my life's work, specializing in Upper Canada to help others researching in this difficult period and location. Since that time, I've developed additional speciaties in fur trade and Aboriginal research, criminal justice records, and turning bare bones genealogies into full-fledged family histories.

Recent projects have included providing "behind-the-scenes" genealogical research for the CBC TV program "Who Do You Think You Are?" (aired October 2007 to February 2008) and working with the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples as a genealogical consultant for Métis genealogy.

2012 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed., Dec. 5, 2012
7:30pm
A Christmas Review of the Queen's Jubilee, by Garry Toffoli

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"A Christmas Review of the Queen's Jubilee, by Garry Toffoli"

There have been many celebrations of the Queen's Jubilee in 2012. Review those and related and ancillary events, with a bit of a taste of Christmas Royal to highlight the season. With the early-Dec. announcement of an expected Royal birth, interesting points about the succession to the throne were presented.

Garry Toffoli is a life member of the Monarchist League of Canada and a recipient of their Gold Badge of Service, also a recipient of the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. He is a member of several royalty-related groups, and is Executive Director of the Canadian Royal Heritage Trust.

Garry is a co-author of numerous books, including "Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother 1900-2002" and "Lives of the Princesses of Wales".

Garry will be remembered by a number of members as the Founder and Organizer of the Queen's Birthday Parade 1984 to 2003, in which the Gov. Simcoe Branch participated for many years.


Wed., Nov. 7, 2012
7:30pm
"York County Families and The War of 1812", by John Warburton

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"Lest We Forget - Some Families of York County in the War of 1812", by John Warburton

Share with the people of York, through their own words, feelings about some of the battles.
See, by firsthand accounts, the aftermath of a war that came all too close to home.
Remember the sacrifices given by the Militiamen of York. >br>There will be special emphasis on Loyalist Families.

John Dale Warburton U.E.

Born in Paignton, Devon, England (not far from the final resting place of John Graves Simcoe), John came to Canada in 1953, where he was raised and educated in Toronto and Scarborough. He has had many roles in the education and historical fields:

- Former school teacher in Scarborough
- Scout Executive and Trainer in Toronto and Southern Ontario -1977-1983
- Officer in St. John Ambulance Brigade for six years (has been taking St. John First Aid courses since the1960's)
- Historical interpreter with Black Creek Pioneer Village 1989-1996; including being relief for the miller and for a brief time having responsibility for the Roblin Mill.
- Interpreted the Grain Barn for B.C.P.V.
- Freelance historian; performances at many venues across the Province as broom maker, farmer/rope maker and phrenologist

John has been a contributor to books on Loyalist history in Toronto, an executive member since 1990 of Toronto Branch UELAC where he is currently President, a Central West Region VP, UELAC, and is a recipient of the Ontario Heritage Trust Certificate of Achievement.


Wed., Oct 3, 2012
7:30pm
"The Tiles of St. Alban's", by Diane Berlet

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"The "Loyalist Tiles of St. Alban's", by Diane Berlet
Sitting by the Loyalist Parkway in the Village of Adolphustown, St. Alban the Martyr Anglican Church - The "Loyalist" Church - was constructed as a memorial to the United Empire Loyalists. The Tiles, ordered by subscription to help fund the building of the church, are unique. Diane will present information about St. Alban's, the tiles and the book, by the same name, that she and Graem Coles created and was published in 2011.


Wed., May 2, 2012
7:30pm
"Simcoe's Trip up the Humber", by Iain Craig

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"Retracing Simcoe's Trip up the Humber", by Iain Craig

This presentation is about the Re-enactment of Gov. Simcoe's trip from York to Beausoleil Island in 1793. We did this trip using 4 North Canoes (similar to the canoes that Simcoe and his Queen's Rangers would have used) on three consecutive weekends in Sept of 1996 - the 200th Anniversary of the opening of Yonge St.
The first weekend was simply a matter of rowing Simcoe in a bateaux from Old Fort York to the Humber, and paddling up to the Old Mill. We did not do any of the Carrying Place Trail trip that took Simcoe to the Holland Marsh.
The second weekend started in the Holland Marsh and followed the Holland River to Lake Simcoe - where we re-enacted the naming of Lake Simcoe. Sunday of that weekend was very stormy, and we struggled to get to Washago by late in the afternoon.
The third weekend started in Washago and finished in Penetanguishene (in a thunderstorm). There were about 30 paddlers who participated in the paddling part of the re-enactment. We had a road crew of 10 people, and the support of 3 Historical Societies. The trip was a great paddling experience, and proved that this was not an easy trip for Simcoe and his Queen's Rangers. On his return from this trip he decided to build Yonge St. and this road has been a focal point in the settlement and development of Southern Ontario.

Iain Craig is a retired High School Math Teacher, who lives in Kleinburg. He is an active marathon canoe racer and National Team dragonboater. Hi sits on the board of Canoe Kayak Ontario and is an organizer of the annual Marsh Mash Canoe and Kayak Race in Bradford. Presently he chairs the TRCA's Humber Alliance and is active on several TRCA sub-watershed committees. He is actively involved in stopping a road that would have passed through Boyd Park.


Wed., Apr. 4, 2012 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed. Mar. 7, 2012
St David's Anglican
Church basement
49 Donlands
“1812 Bicentennial Plans”
by Sandra Shaul, & David O'Hara

"Toronto's Plans and Activities for the War of 1812 Bicentennial" by Sandra Shaul, City of Toronto, &
David O'Hara, Fort York.

With the activities to celebrate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 now under way, Sandra will give an overview of the Bicentennial in Toronto -- our legacy projects, key signature event periods and the event highlights and where people can find out more.

Dave will talk about plans for the Fort York National Historic Site, our largest legacy project. Gov. Simcoe Branch has had a long-time association with Fort York and seeing the plans which have been developing for a long while come to fruition at this time is rewarding.

Sandra Shaul is the project manager for the City of Toronto Bicentennial Commemoration of the War of 1812. Trained as an art historian, with many years of museum experience, she also brings to her role considerable experience as an editor and writer in both print and web media. Sandra enjoys a good story and believes that the War is exceptionally rich in thought-provoking material.

For more than 13 years, she was Head of Publications at the Royal Ontario Museum, where she also edited Rotunda Magazine. Later, her work as a web project manager and information architect involved assignments in Canada and the US.

Sandra is very involved in the Toronto heritage community, leading the Annex heritage conservation district study as a member of the Annex Residents' Association. Before joining the City, she was vice-chair of the Toronto and East York Community Preservation Panel with some involvement on the City's Preservation Board.

David O'Hara is Museum Administrator for Fort York National Historic Site, which is owned and operated as a museum by the City of Toronto. A landscape architect and registered professional planner, David worked for more than twelve years as a park planner with the City of Toronto prior to his appointment to the fort in January 2005.

David played a large role in creating the Public Space Framework Plan as part of efforts to revitalize Toronto's waterfront and, as project lead for the development of the Harbourfront parks and open space system, coordinated the design competition for HTO Park.

In his role at Fort York, David is coordinating the development of the full 43-acre site, which includes the completion of various landscape-related projects and the construction of a new Visitor Centre. The development will also take into account the massive amount of urban growth occurring around the fort.


Sat. Feb. 11, 2012
Noon for 12:30 potluck
St David's Towers,
Community Room,
51 Donlands.
“Captain Jonathan Williams”
by Sue Hines UE

"Captain Jonathan and Marie Williams, and son Col. Titus Williams" by Sue Hines.

Spies and family intrigue have always held an interest for me, but to find that my own family might have been a part of this very thing has been quite exciting. As with many early immigrant families mine is filled with those who fought on the side of the rebels and those who remained loyal to the King.

My proven UE ancestor, Captain Jonathan Williams and his wife Marie (Mary) Titus were from opposite sides of the political fence of the late 1700's. How this happened, how they met and eventually married and what real part Jonathan played has in part at least been left up to family historians to spin.

I have been fortunate to find a good deal about him and his family, as well as Mary's family, and the roles they played not only at that time, but in the settlement of early New York. I look forward to sharing a little about this couple and their son Col. Titus Williams, my 3rd great grandfather and a rather interesting character from the War of 1812.

Sue Hines: I am, by profession a child protection worker, having been in the field for 39 years. Recently given a new Provincial project, I expect to be involved for another 4 or 5 years.

My interest in history came at a very early age, the result of a mother and maternal grandfather who lived and breathed history. As a young teen, historical fiction was my passion and the characters from the text books whose own lives and stories were often presented in such a dry manner, actually came to life for me. This passion really has never changed.

Family history took on an entirely new meaning when a cousin from Michigan wrote the story of my mother's family, traced to the Island of Nantucket in 1640. This began a 40 year journey of my own, one I keep promising myself will end soon, with the printing of our family history.

2011 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed. Dec. 7, 2011
“Captain John DeCou”
“UELAC Update”
by Robert McBride UE

"Captain John DeCou, son of Jacob DeCou III UE" by Robert McBride UE.

"UELAC Update" by Robert McBride UE.

Jacob DeCou III UE served in Colonel Barton's First Battalion of the New Jersey Volunteers and his oldest son, my third great grandfather, Captain John DeCou, created a series of mills at DeCew Falls near present-day St. Catharines, Ontario, served in the War of 1812, was captured and escaped to return from Philadelphia to renew the fight here in Upper Canada, was one of the original founders of the Welland Canal, and later founded Decewsville, in Haldimand County, Upper Canada, where he, his wife, and many of their children are buried. During the American Revolution, Laura Secord ended her famous trek at the home of Captain John DeCou, where she warned Lieutenant FitzGibbon about the advancing American troops.

Grietje and Bob will co-present the story of Captain John DeCou. As Canada and the USA, especially Ontario where many of the battles were fought, begin the bicentennial commemoration of the War of 1812, this subject is particularly timely.

Bob was elected President of UELAC at the recent June AGM of UELAC in Brockville Ontario. Before his election, he held the position of Sr. VP for two years and since June has visited a number of branches. Bob will give us an update on the Association's progress and position with respect to its primary objective: to preserve and promote the Loyalist Heritage.

Grietje and Bob McBride are retired elementary public school teachers, living on a hundred-acre farm, just east of Peterborough, in a stone farm house built in 1854. They have on-going committee responsibilities in Keene United Church. They are the parents of three married daughters and have four grandchildren.

Bob is a Freemason and was the Peterborough District Deputy Grand Master for 2007 – 2008. He also served on two Grand Lodge committees, as the Editor of The Ontario Mason Magazine and as the Team Leader and Editor of the quarterly academic journal, Reflections.

In May 1993, Bob joined Kawartha Branch as the direct descendant of seven known Loyalists, Jacob DeCou III being one of them. Grietje McBride is a direct descendant of Sgt. Gabriel Purdy UE who settled in Nova Scotia after the war.

Grietje and Bob are both members of Kawartha Branch of UELAC, each of them having served as Branch President and they co-chaired the committee that organized the UELAC Conference & AGM in 2004 in Peterborough.

Bob is the Editor of The Loyalist Gazette and Grietje is the Book Review Editor.


Wed. Nov. 2, 2011
“Feasting and Fasting”
by Dorothy Duncan

"Feasting and Fasting: Canada's Heritage Celebrations" by Dorothy Duncan

Long before the arrival of newcomers, the First Nations were celebrating the passages of life, the changing seasons, and the gifts of the Great Spirit. When newcomers began to arrive, they brought with them the memories and traditions of their homelands. Food brought families and communities together to pay tribute, to honour, to celebrate, to mourn and to be comforted. This will be a sampling of events and what was on our ancestor's tables at births, weddings, funerals, religious holidays, garden parties, political picnics, and more!

Dorothy will bring some tiny samples of the historic foods our ancestors would have known, for those brave enough to try them

Dorothy Duncan has addressed our branch on several occasions and often provided us with advice as well. She has always been involved with history in the form of museums, restorations and especially interpretation of the past. She has been curator of Black Creek Pioneer Village, and latterly Executive Director of OHS. Retired since Jan. of 2002, she is involved with Cuisine Canada and the Jane Austen Society. Dorothy has received the Order of Ontario, and an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from University of Waterloo. She is a Fellow of the Canadian Museum Association, and most recently was named Woman of the Year by the Toronto Women's Culinary Network.


Wed., Oct. 5, 2011 7:30pm
"Two Nations, One King." by Jean Rae Baxter

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Two Nations, One King, by Jean Rae Baxter

Today, in any discussion of war and politics in the Middle East, someone is sure to say, "Really, it's all about oil." In the 18th Century, when talking about war and politics in North America, it would have been equally reasonable to say, "Really, it's all about land." Both comments, although simplistic, contain a large measure of truth.

In Jean Rae Baxter's research for the novel Broken Trail she was struck by the fact that there were two big issues motivating those who sought independence from Britain. Although the one we hear about most is, "No Taxation without Representation," Britain's imperial policy for the wilderness, summed up in the Royal Proclamation of 1763, caused even more outrage in some quarters than did the notorious Stamp Act.

The native people were becoming aware of the threat posed by the aspirations of landless frontiersmen and greedy land speculators. Taking stock of the situation, native leaders had the best interests of their own people in mind when they decided to ally themselves with England against those seeking independence. As this presentation will show, there were profound differences between Britain's attitude to the native people and that of those leading the fight for independence. And those differences had more to do with land than with anything else.

The subject of this presentation is Britain's relationship with the native people from the early 18th Century until the conclusion of the American War of Independence. Jean will begin with the "Four Kings" who went to visit Queen Anne in the first decade of the 18th Century, and end with the granting of the Haldimand Tract. She will focus on the relationship with Britain of the Mohawks in the north and the Cherokees in the south.

Leadership styles and the personalities of key figures played an important role. In the north, one finds Superintendent for Indian Affairs Sir William Johnson, warrior/statesman Joseph Brant, and Molly Brant. In the south, their counterparts are Superintendent John Stuart, his deputy Alexander Cameron, the Cherokees' Peace Chief Attakulla Kulla and his defiant son Dragging Canoe. These were all interesting, colourful people whose roles helped to shape history.

The talk will be illustrated with contemporary portraits and depictions of historical events of the time.

Jean Rae Baxter UE holds an honours B.A. and an M.A. in English from the University of Toronto as well as a B.Ed from Queen's. Following a career in education, she turned to writing full time a dozen years ago. Broken Trail (2011), the second novel in her trilogy set during the American Revolution, shows the situation of the native people caught up in the American Revolution. This novel follows The Way Lies North (2007) dealt with the plight of Loyalists living in the Mohawk Valley. The final book in the trilogy, The Runaways (to be released in 2012), looks at England's policy regarding slavery and the role played by slaves during the Revolution.


Wed., May 4, 2011 7:30pm
"Toronto Island" by Jane Fairburn

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Toronto Island, part of "A New Look and New Insights on the Shoreline and Island" by Jane Fairburn

Jane Fairburn's primary passion is the Toronto waterfront. Jane has recently completed a manuscript - "A New Look and New Insights on the Shoreline and Island" - which explores the history, landscape and people of Toronto shore. Her work traces the development of four districts of the Toronto lakefront from east to west — namely the Scarborough Bluffs, the Beach, the Island, and the Lakeshore — that first developed into villages and later became suburbs or adjuncts of a centre that began as a garrison town. She focuses on the evolution and innermost nature of each of these special places along the shore of Lake Ontario that remain distinct from the centre and still share a common culture through a unique connection to the Lake and the natural world. The story is that of a vital, richly endowed waterfront heritage, one that still exists in these communities yet largely has gone unrecognized and is for the most part forgotten.

After some initial comments on the shoreline and its early development, the focus of this talk will be on the research Jane has undertaken with respect to the Toronto Island.

Jane Fairburn is the Communications Director of Bright Negawatts Inc., a leading Canadian cleantech company. She is also a lawyer. Graduating from the University of Toronto with an honours B.A. in Political Science, she studied law at the University of Windsor and was called to the Bar in 1990. Thereafter she practiced in the field of criminal litigation, both as Crown Counsel and for the defence, and then graduated to the areas of legal policy and law reform.


Wed., Apr. 6, 2011 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar 2, 2011
"The Royal Mail from York", by Kate McAuley

At St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Over Any Distance Imaginable: The Royal Mail from York, by Kate McAuley
In 1833, York was undergoing exponential growth due to immigration from the old world, and a population experiencing both hope and doubt in the new one. 1833 was also the year that James Scott Howard built his new home and office: the Post Office on Duke Street, a building that became the meeting place for all of Toronto's 9000 residents. It was from this office that the growing pains of Toronto, and of Canada, were expressed on paper, and sent around the world. Writing and post-office paraphernalia will be featured, as well as the letters that passed back and forth over the counter manned by Postmaster Howard. These artefacts tell the stories and secrets of Toronto's early citizens, and of how their words were transported around the world – over rough water and even rougher roads – or lost along the way.

Toronto's First Post Office, operated by the Town of York Historical Society, is the custodian of an unparalleled collection of artefacts relating to early 19th century communication, and is a post office as well as a museum. As in 1834, Toronto's First Post Office is the only full-service post office in the city, operating seven days a week. For more information, please visit www.townofyork.com.

Kate McAuley is the Assistant Curator at Toronto's First Post Office. She specialized in History at Queen's University in England and Kingston, and studied Education at the University of Edinburgh. In addition to TFPO, she has worked with the collection at the Simcoe County Museum, and as an interpreter at Black Creek Pioneer Village, Gibson House Museum, Zion Historic Schoolhouse, and Mackenzie House. At the Post Office, she conducts education tours, maintains the collection and research library, and has curated and co-curated several exhibits, including From Feathers to Steel: The Rise of the Dip Pen, and Over Any Distance Imaginable: The Royal Mail from York, which appeared at The Market Gallery in 2008-2009.


Sat., Feb 12, 2011
noon Potluck Lunch
and
"Toronto in 1834" by Norie Jacobs
St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Toronto in 1834 by Norie Jacobs

Take a journey back through time to Toronto in 1834. Learn about the early settlement of York and how the town evolved into the city of Toronto. Topics that will be covered include: population growth, sanitary conditions, buildings (commercial and residential districts), social customs, establishment of financial institutions and fire companies as well as local government and justice, politics, commerce and industry, education, religion and health and welfare. This presentation will be fully supported by drawings from the period and delivered from the perspective of a person actually living in 1834 projecting to an audience of the future...2011.

Norie Jacobs has enjoyed a very diverse and eclectic background. A native of Toronto, she has always been an avid student of history and is currently a board member of the York Pioneer & Historical Society. She has a honours degree from the University of Toronto with a specialist designation in English Literature, a major in Modern Languages and a minor in Psychology. Norie began her employment career in finance working as a Money Market Trader, Manager Treasury Services, Financial Analyst and has been a licensed stock broker. For the past twenty years, Norie has owned and operated a successful employment consulting business focusing her recruitment activities primarily within the technical field conducting business with Lighting, Industrial Supply, Wire and Cable, Electrical, Pneumatic, Hydraulic and Electromechanical companies.

Norie starting collecting antiques at the age of twelve and currently lives in a Century home in downtown Toronto filled with antique furniture, accessories and art. Norie has written several articles on local history and antiques and conducts public lectures on various topics on a regular basis. She has lived in England and Spain and has travelled extensively throughout the world.

2010 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed., Dec 1, 2010
"Origins Of Christmas Traditions" by Garry Toffoli

St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Origins Of Christmas Traditions by Garry Toffoli

The history and royal connections, some centuries old and some quite recent, behind twelve of the most popular Christmas traditions provide the theme for this seasonal presentation that is both entertaining and informative. The talk will be illustrated with a slide show.

Garry Toffoli is a life member of the Monarchist League of Canada and a recipient of their Gold Badge of Service, also a recipient of the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. He is a member of several royalty-related groups, and is Executive Director of the Canadian Royal Heritage Trust.

Garry is a co-author of numerous books, including "Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother 1900-2002" and "Lives of the Princesses of Wales".

Garry will be remembered by a number of members as the Founder and Organizer of the Queen's Birthday Parade 1984 to 2003, in which the Gov. Simcoe Branch participated for many years.


Wed., Nov 2, 2010 7:30pm
"Aeneas Shaw UEL" by Richard Shaw

St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Aeneas Shaw UEL, by Richard Shaw

Capt. Aeneas Shaw was born in 1740, in Strathnairn, Scotland. He joined the British army and served in Europe. He settled in Long Island N.Y.in 1770. The Military followed him and by 1776 the British-Rebel battle line was 6 km from his farm. He joined the Queens Rangers under Richard Rogers, and from 1777 under John Graves Simcoe.

At war's end Capt Shaw took his new wife and son and settled in Nashwaak Village, N.B. In 1792 he accepted Simcoe's offer to come to Upper Canada with Queens Rangers. In 1793 his wife Ann and his 4 sons and 2 daughters joined him. He was a Member of Parliament in 1794-98, rose to the rank of Maj. Gen during the War of 1812, but died at York in 1814.

Richard Shaw is a 5th generation Torontonian who grew up in the west end. He moved to Ajax/Whitby when he married but continued to work in Toronto. He has 2 children, a son Stephen and a daughter Alexandra.


Wed., Oct 6, 2010 7:30pm
"Loyal She Began -- The Mapping of Upper Canada." by Ed Rutherford

St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Loyal She Began -- The Mapping of Upper Canada, by Ed Rutherford

An overview of the history of our Province, illustrated with the maps that were drawn through the centuries. Touching on the early years of Cartier and Champlain, we will concentrate on the years leading up to, and following, the establishment of Upper Canada. We will meet the people who were a part of the history of that time --- well known names like Carleton and Simcoe, and lesser known ones like Smythe and Shisted. This presentation will be fully illustrated and several antique maps will be on display.

Ed Rutherford: A native of London, England, Ed and his twin brother at age 12 came to Canada as War Guests at the time of the 'Blitz' in 1940. He attended Etobicoke High School, Toronto Teachers' College and the University of Toronto. Ed spent forty years as a teacher in Elementary and Secondary schools and as a school principal. Retired, he presents costumed presentations dealing with Canadian history to about one hundred schools each year. He and his wife have three grown sons.


Sat., June 19, 2010 2:00pm
Loyalist Day
Strawberry Social and Program

St. David's Towers
51 Donlands Ave.

Loyalist Day Celebration: Strawberry Social and Program

Please join us to celebrate Loyalist Day and enjoy fresh Ontario strawberries – mark your calendar now:
- Saturday, 19 June, 2010, 2:00 to 4:00+ pm
- St. David's Towers Community Room (51 Donlands, next door to the Church)
- Strawberry shortcake, tea, cookies etc.

Program:
- Loyalist Music
- Period Clothing
- Loyalist Vignettes
- Period games and puzzles

Bring your family and especially children and others who cannot make the regular Wednesday evening meetings. We have invited members of Toronto Branch to join us, so come and warmly welcome them and help make the day a special one.

As we will need to order food etc., please let Daryl Currie 416-469-0851 know if you are attending and how many people by Monday June 14.


Wed., May 5, 2010 7:30pm
"Heraldry, and a Loyalist Connection" by David Rumball UE

St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Heraldry, and a Loyalist Connection, by David Rumball UE

"Heraldry is the profession, study, or art of devising, granting, and blazoning arms and ruling on questions of rank or protocol, as exercised by an officer of arms. Heraldry comes from Anglo-Norman herald, from the Germanic compound *harja-waldaz, "army commander". The word, in its most general sense, encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. To most, though, heraldry is the practice of designing, displaying, describing, and recording coats of arms and heraldic badges." – Wikipedia.

This presentation about heraldry will cover the development of heraldry from the 11th century to the present, and the development of those who were experts and who "manage" it into an authority. This includes the evolution of the Canadian Heraldic Authority, the Crown agency which grants coats of arms in Canada.

Part of David's presentation will be about the components or parts of a coat of arms, and why there is no such thing as a "family coat of arms." As an example, the UELAC coat of arms, its meaning and historical development will be used. David's personal arms feature 4 UEL coronets, the only hereditary device in Canadian heraldry.

Captain David Rumball CD, AdeC, MA, UE, LRHSC, FRHSC(Hon), OLJ resides in Peterborough where he works part-time as Operations Manager, Homegrown Homes, which is responsible for maintenance and tenant issues with a not-for-profit agency of the City of Peterborough providing affordable housing.

David served in the military 1982-2000 Canadian Forces Primary Reserves, 9 years with the Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment, retiring as an infantry company commander and 8 years with 7 Toronto Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, finishing as battery commander. He retired with the rank of captain, and was qualified to the next rank of major.

David is a graduate of Trent University (1984, Honours Bachelor of Arts) and of the American Military University in Virginia (2000, Masters of Arts in History). In 2009, he was appointed an Aide-de-Camp to His Honour the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, and the same year was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Heraldry Society of Canada.

A man of many interests, David will share one of those, heraldy, with us.


Wed., Apr. 7, 2010 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar. 3, 2010
"The Georgian Town of York" by Richard Fiennes-Clinton

St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

The Georgian Town of York, by Richard Fiennes-Clinton

The presentation will cover the earliest plans for the Town of York, including plans that were drawn up but never implemented, prior to Simcoe's town of 1793. Also included will be a "virtual" stroll through the early town, as it was in the 1790s, and afterwards. Some of the street names have remained the same, but many have changed. Explore the original nomenclature of early streets, and hear a short biography of some of the Georgian-era luminaries after whom the earliest streets were named. As time went on, and the Georgian era came to a close, the street names were often changed, and the early map of Toronto evolved into today's streetscape.

The presentation will describe the homes and buildings from the early Town of York - what was built, what has been lost over the years, and in a few fortunate examples, what has survived. Tens of thousands of buildings have been destroyed in Toronto in the last half century. A few were notable; many were more prosaic, but together they provide a glimpse into how our municipal ancestors lived and worked. While the tangible buildings themselves may have been lost, the images of many remain.

Richard Fiennes-Clinton has operated an historical walking tour company called "Muddy York Walking Tours" for over ten years. This presentation will be a hybrid of a number of tours, including Toronto in the Nineteenth Century, and the History of Toronto's Street Names. This is an opportunity to explore early Toronto from the comfort of the indoors, without even having to go outside! An added benefit is that we will have the opportunity to view a few images of "lost Toronto", which isn't possibily when walking the modern city streets.


Sat., Feb. 13, 2010
noon Potluck Lunch
and
"Milling about Ontario" by John Warburton

St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

Milling about Ontario

Assist farmer P. J. Fitzgerald (a.k.a. John Warburton) as he threshes, winnows, and grinds wheat into flour. Then, follow the industrialization of the province with the focus on Loyalist and local water-powered Grist Mills. Learn how they worked, where they were, and where they are.

John Dale Warburton U.E.

Born in Paignton, Devon, England (not far from the final resting place of John Graves Simcoe), John came to Canada in 1953, where he was raised and educated in Toronto and Scarborough. He has had many roles in the education and historical fields:

- Former school teacher in Scarborough
- Scout Executive and Trainer in Toronto and Southern Ontario -1977-1983
- Officer in St. John Ambulance Brigade for six years (has been taking St. John First Aid courses since the1960's)
- Historical interpreter with Black Creek Pioneer Village 1989-1996; including being relief for the miller and for a brief time having responsibility for the Roblin Mill.
- Interpreted the Grain Barn for B.C.P.V.
-Freelance historian; performances at many venues across the Province as broom maker, farmer/rope maker and phrenologist

John has been a contributor to books on Loyalist history in Toronto, an executive member since 1990 of Toronto Branch, UELAC, UELAC, a Central West Region VP, UELAC, and is a recipient of the Ontario Heritage Trust Certificate of Achievement.

2009 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed Dec. 2, 2009 7:30pm
“A Dirty, Trifling, Piece of Business” by Gavin Watt

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

A Dirty, Trifling, Piece of Business, by Gavin Watt (Rescheduled from Oct. 7)

Also the title of his latest book about the American Revolution with a focus on the Loyalist - which includes our native allies - participation in partnership with the British forces, this presentation describes raids of 1781. The raids into the Mohawk and Schoharie came in a constant flood. That year there were over thirty-five raids into the Mohawk, Schoharie and upper Hudson Valleys before the two big expeditions of October.

So, if you were a farm family somewhere near Canajoharie in the Mohawk, or Middleburg in the Schoharie, or Saratoga in the upper Hudson, you had to be on your guard constantly. You lived in an undercurrent of fear, tension and suspicion. Every stranger on the road; every flitting shadow in the woods; every random shot in the next valley; every column of smoke rising from over the hill — virtually every unexpected event was a potential threat to your life.

Some raids were small and opportunistic. A small war band of Indians out for plunder and captives fell on an outlying farm, or ambushed a detachment of rebels.

Other raids targeted ardent rebels for abduction, as carrying them off to Canada would damage rebel morale and disrupt their political and military systems. These personages could be exchanged for a senior Briton or loyalist being held captive. The 1781 campaign saw several of these attempts, some comical, some tragic. For instance, one ended with the senior agent running off with a young girl instead of his target. Still others were larger native raids. One of the greatest disasters to rebel arms that year was the catastrophic, perfectly-executed ambush of a company of rangers by Onondagas and Cayugas.

Then, there were the British Secret Service's frustrating negotiations with the independent republic of Vermont. They kept Vermont out of the war and gave the British free-reign of Lakes Champlain and George. Secret Service operatives were drawn from the King's Rangers, Royal Yorkers and Peters', Jessup's and McAlpin's Corps.

The two climactic expeditions came in October. Major John Ross led forces deep into the Mohawk Valley, almost to Schenectady, without a single rebel scout discovering their presence. Almost simultaneously Lieutenant-Colonel Barry St. Leger led forces south on Lake Champlain to Ticonderoga. This large expedition did very little fighting; its major role was a feint to draw off rebel forces, which it most successfully accomplished, and to bring the Vermont negotiations to a climax - for which purpose it failed.

For more details of the book, visit UELAC.org's book reviews section.

Gavin Watt, a resident of the Toronto area has been retired from his working career for nearly ten years, but will likely never retire form his avocation, military history. He is the founder, and was President, of the Museum of Applied Military History from 1977-2007. But to those of us with Loyalist interests, his presence has been keenly appreciated. Gavin is the founder, and was Officer Commanding, of the recreated King's Royal Yorkers from 1975-2006, a unit with which he continues his valued involvement. Perhaps to a much broader audience of historically interested readers, Gavin has researched extensively the military actions and people of the American Revolution, and authoured or co-authoured several books, including "The Burning of the Valleys, Daring Raids Against the New York Frontier in the Fall of 1780", "The Flockey — 13 August 1777 — The Defeat of the Tory uprising in the Schoharie Valley" and "Rebellion in the Mohawk Valley — The St. Leger Expedition of 1777" which was selected by Books on Canada 2003 for History as an example of "best writing and research".

Gavin's passion for military research is evident in his contributions as Honorary Vice-President of the UELAC, and his enthusiastic presentations - don't miss it.


Wed Nov. 4, 2009 7:30pm
“Slavery in the Town of York” by Hilary Dawson

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

As the Thirteen Colonies moved towards civil war, those loyal to the Crown found life increasingly difficult. Throughout the war, Loyalists packed up their families, valuables and most portable possessions, and moved behind British lines. Many counted Black slaves among their personal property.

Several of these slave-owning families settled in Upper Canada, and advertisements like "For Sale, a Negro Wench" appeared in the newspapers. From information found in original documents, historian Hilary J. Dawson will introduce Henry Prince, Peggy and other people of colour who were regarded as property by such influential figures as William Jarvis and Peter Russell.

Hilary Dawson, now a genealogist & historical researcher, grew up in Hull, England. She has a degree in archaeology and mediaeval history from Southampton University, UK. Her interest in Black History has deep roots. Her home town was also the birthplace of William Wilberforce, the abolitionist. Hilary's first museum job was in Wilberforce House, William Wilberforce's home.

Hilary's research into nineteenth century Etobicoke Township (York County, now part of Toronto) uncovered a previously unknown Black presence. She curated several Black History Month exhibits at Montgomery's Inn museum. In 2002, the Etobicoke Historical Society presented her with the Jean Hibbert Award for her contribution to Etobicoke's history. She is currently working on the biography of Alfred Lafferty, Chatham's first Black lawyer. The Lafferty family's story (">From Immigrant to Establishment: a Black Family's Journey") appeared in the Spring 2007 issue of Ontario History.


Wed Oct. 7, 2009 7:30pm
at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

2009 UELAC Conference Review with Doug Grant

Doug Grant was one of the Gov. Simcoe Branch attendees at the 2009 UELAC Conference in Napanee and Adolphustown Ontario. He showed slides taken at the conference and Annual General Meting, and discussed the events held over the course of the long weekend in June.

(The originally scheduled speaker, Gavin Watt, was unable to attend. His presentation, "A Dirty, Trifling, Piece of Business," has been rescheduled for December 2.)


Wed May. 6, 2009 7:30pm
“Facing the Invincible Frenzy” by Tim Compeau

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

Facing the Invincible Frenzy: A New England Loyalist and the Ties of Family by Tim Compeau

Although the American Revolution tore the British Empire apart, many family and kinship networks remained intact. Some loyalist exiles used their prewar connections to help mitigate the trauma and hardship of exile and reconstruct shattered identities and lives in Upper Canada. Tim will share his research on the biography of Joel Stone, the loyalist founder of Gananoque, Ontario. Stone's story reveals how his family and other personal ties from Connecticut held together in spite of his exile, and helped him form a new community along the St. Lawrence River.

Tim Compeau received his Honours BA from Queen's University in 2004. In 2006 he graduated from the University of Western Ontario with an MA in Public History. Tim is in his second year of a PhD at the University of Western Ontario, and is the recipient of the United Empire Loyalist Scholarship. His dissertation is entitled: "Reconciling Revolution: Loyalists and Patriots in the Revolutionary Atlantic, 1775-1815." In it, he intends to explore how cultural conventions, such as honour codes and family allegiance, helped loyalists re-establish themselves and their sense of identity in new situations and environments.


Wed., Apr. 1, 2009 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed Jan. 7, 2009 7:30pm

MEETING CANCELLED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER

Tim Compeau's presentation has been rescheduled for May 6.


Wed Mar. 4, 2009 7:30pm
“The Power of Three” by Fred Hayward, UE

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

The Power of Three by Fred Hayward, UE, President, UELAC

For his presentation on the third month of the year, March 4, Fred proposed to continue an a theme he initiated at his inauguration in Saint John - the power of three. Now one-third the way through his present term of office, he will reflect on at least three of the surprises encountered as president. Of the many challenges facing our organization as we approach our centenary, he said he would try to limit his discussion to a simple triad. As the spring meeting of the Dominion Council will be held three days later, members can expect that the material will be up-to-date.

Since he was last here in December 2004, Frederick H. Hayward, our UELAC President, has continued to broaden his understanding of both the operations and history of our Association. While he has yet to find a replacement to handle the specific challenges of the Education and Outreach Committee, he has served as the UELAC Vice-President, with additional responsibilities as Chairman of the Finance Committee and the Grants Committee. Since his July 2008 election in Saint John, Fred has participated in both the Pacific and Prairie Regional meetings in Chilliwack, Vancouver and Regina as well addressed the Col. Butler, Sir Guy Carleton and Heritage Branches. In addition, he has continued to submit articles for Loyalist Trails and the Monuments and Commemoratives section of the Dominion website.


Sat., Feb. 7, 2009 at noon
Potluck Lunch and
“Richard Beasley's Upper Canada”
by David Beasley

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"From Bloody Beginnings; Richard Beasley's Upper Canada" by David Beasley

David Beasley will talk about his book, From Bloody Beginnings: Richard Beasley's Upper Canada, and its protagonist. A description of the book follows.

Richard Beasley narrates from when he is five years old in 1766 as witness to the tenant rebellions in New York State followed by the American Revolution when his father Henry Beasley and Uncle Richard Cartwright in Albany, New York, risk their lives through the horrors of the civil war for the loyalist forces. Richard Beasley becomes a commissary at Fort Niagara, from which he observes the war out of Niagara featuring his cousin Richard Cartwright Jr,, secretary to Major John Butler of Butler's Rangers, Chief Joseph Brant and Ensign Walter Butler while he continues his fur-trading at Toronto and the Head-of-the-Lake Ontario. After the war, his land dealings, merchant business and association in trade with Richard Cartwright Jr and Robert Hamilton, his arguments on the settlers' behalf in the legislature where he was speaker of the Assembly, and his involvement as agent in the German land companies in Markham and Waterloo Counties, particularly during the Aaron Burr conspiracy with the French to retake Canada, make him suspect to the oligarchy in York, later Toronto. As magistrate and organizer of the militia in West York he takes on several roles during the War of 1812. The battles in the Niagara Peninsula, which involve the 2nd York Regiment of which he is Colonel, he describes in detail.

As his intellectual cousin Richard Cartwright becomes more conservative and prominent, Richard Beasley grows more liberal. His correspondence with the famous defender of civil liberties Lord Erskine, his work for a free press, his championing of the reforms of Robert Gourlay and his friendship as a moderate reformer with William Lyon Mackenzie continue the political themes introduced earlier in the book. He manages to overturn the judgment of a military tribunal set up to ruin him by his powerful enemies, including Reverend Strachan and Col. William Claus, for his political views. He relates the economic blights, the pastimes, the joys and sorrows of the settlers with particular emphasis on affairs at the Head-of-the-Lake, which, with his help, becomes Hamilton, a county capital. He gives us interesting details of the Upper Canada Rebellion and shows that many among the Upper Canadian community sympathized with it. In his last stint in the Assembly he does much for the establishment of civil rights and works with his one-time conservative opponent John Beverley Robinson for the country's benefit before the uniting of the provinces in the Act of Union of 1841.

RICHARD BEASLEY gives us a personal, continuous and dramatic picture of our history and the characters that made it. Richard died in 1842.

David Beasley was born in Hamilton, Ontario; he graduated from McMaster University in 1953, lived in Europe for five years, working, teaching, writing, studying modern French literature in Paris, German romantic literature in Vienna. He came to New York City to marry a lady working in the United Nations and stayed for 35 years. He earned a Master of Library Science degree from Pratt Institute, worked at the New York Public Research Libraries, organized and was president of the library workers' union, and earned a PhD in political economics at the New School for Social Research. He wrote books and articles during this time. Most of his books contain a large amount of original research. He returned to live in Canada in 1992 and has been writing and issuing his books from his Davus Publishing in Simcoe, Ontario. Following is a list of his books, followed by a list of his pamphlets.

2008 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed Dec. 3, 2008 7:30pm
“Perspectives of a Native Loyalist” by David Morrison

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

Perspectives of a Native Loyalist by David Kanowakeron Hill Morrison UE

Dave Hill Morrison UE is a Status Mohawk of the Six Nations of the Grand River and a direct descendant of Joseph Brant. He lives in the Rochester New York area and is an active member of Grand River Branch.

Dave was born, adopted and raised in the Rochester area. He has a B.A. in Psychology and Computer Science and was employed in the IT industry for more than twenty years. A dual-citizen, after a ten-year search, he re-united and began a close relationship with his birthmother on Six Nations in 1991. At age 37, this reconnection with his natural heritage proved to be a personal discovery into a culture and history which eventually exposed him to the story of the United Empire Loyalists.

Dave's perspective is a result of living in two countries, three nationalities and three distinct cultures... each with its own nuances and mannerisms. A part of each society, Dave is afforded the option of his allegiances and his presence at this meeting is an indication of his preference.

Dave has studied the traditional teachings and history of both the Iroquois Confederacy and his community of the Six Nations. He is active in the Rochester Native community and stays abreast of contemporary issues on both sides of the border. Primarily a writer, Dave also enjoys website designing, computers and traveling.

Dave would like to present his perspective as a Native Loyalist, and looks forward to answering questions and lively discussion.


Wed Nov. 5, 2008 7:30pm
“Life and Times of Colonel David Bridgford” by Dinah Cruse-Hunter

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

Life and Times of Colonel David Bridgford by Dinah Cruse-Hunter

Colonel David Bridgford was a prominent and colourful figure in the history of Richmond Hill. Born in New York City, he came to "The Hill" around 1799 with his mother and stepfather, Robert Marsh, by way of ox-cart, a two-day journey from the Town of York. Bridgford served in The War of 1812 as a captain, and was ordered to man the Fort of York. He participated in the Battle of Detroit and was present when Commander Hull surrendered.

In 1814, he married Lucy Stegman, whose father surveyed much of then Upper Canada. In 1837 he warned the garrison at York of MacKenzie's impending rebellion; he was captured by the rebels and sentenced to death, but was eventually released, only to testify at MacKenzie's trial. Bridgford served as a deputy reeve, a magistrate, a coroner, and president of the Richmond Hill Agricultural Society, before his death in 1868.

Dinah Cruse-Hunter was connected to her Bridgford ancestry by a member of the Ontario Genealogical Society as she searched for her father's lineage. She has initiated a project to raise funds to erect a suitable monument to Col. David Bridgford, her 3rd great grandfather, at his gravesite on October 18, 2008 to mark the 140th anniversary of his passing.


Wed Oct. 1, 2008 7:30pm
“The Facts Behind the Fiction” by Jean Rae Baxter

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

The Facts Behind the Fiction by Jean Rae Baxter

When my novel The Way Lies North was released in September 2007, I thought that my work was done. Focusing on the two-year period that followed the defeat of the British and Loyalist forces at the Battle of Saratoga in October 1777, my purpose had been to present a piece of Loyalist history accurately and from a Canadian point of view. My book, though a work of fiction, was based on lengthy research. In carrying it out, I had followed many side branches and had also accumulated a fascinating collection of 18th Century political cartoons, contemporary drawings and formal portraits of historical figures. Until the Hamilton Branch (my branch) of the United Empire Loyalists invited me to speak, I had not anticipated any further use for this material. But upon receiving the invitation, I saw that "The Facts behind the Fiction" would be of as much interest as the book itself.

What was life like in the Province of New York, and particularly in the Mohawk Valley, in the 1770's? What did the first Loyalist refugees find upon reaching the Upper Country and the safety of a British fort? These questions could lead to many answers, depending on whether one was talking about politics, or education, or the role of the church, or slavery, or the relationship between white colonists and their First Nations allies. Although each of these subjects would take days to exhaust, this narrative with visual images will deliver a vivid overview of the place and time of the Loyalists.

Jean Rae Baxter grew up in Hamilton, but "down home" was the region of Essex and Kent Counties on the shores of Lake Erie where her ancestors had settled, some following the American Revolution and some a century earlier, in the days of New France. There were many family stories to awaken her interest in Canada's past, and frequently in these stories, the lives of settlers were interwoven with those of First Nations people.

After earning her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.Ed degree from Queen's, she taught for many years in the Kingston area, where her interest in Loyalist history led her to find out more about such figures as the Rev'd John Stuart, Sir William Johnson, and Molly Brant. Following her career in education, she returned to Hamilton and embarked upon a writing career. As well as writing short stories and novels, she is the editor of the Hamilton Loyalist, the newsletter of the Hamilton Branch of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada.


Wed May 7, 2008 7:30pm
“Archaeological Excavations at Fort York” by David Spittal

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

Archaeological Excavations at the Birthplace of Toronto - Fort York National Historic Site (1793 - 1934) by David Spittal, Project Coordinator and Archaeologist, City of Toronto

Between 1987 and 2005 a multi-phase restoration project was undertaken at Fort York, a National Historic Site, to renovate the buildings and to upgrade services like sewers and electrical systems.

Many of these restoration projects, which reached into every part of the fort, involved digging below ground. There was, therefore, always the possibility that archaeological resources might be disturbed or destroyed. A major archaeological project was initiated to explore the locations of new works in advance of construction. Archaeological work consisted of excavations in areas where development might have a negative impact on buried resources and of archaeological monitoring of construction as it occurred.

This talk will show many of the areas of archaeological excavation and monitoring, highlighting discoveries like old roadways and the foundations of earlier buildings. The soil layers of deep, well preserved archaeological deposits and the many artifacts recovered from them will illustrate the long history of the Fort York site, including aboriginal occupation, the founding of the fort in the late 18th century by John Graves Simcoe, the War of 1812, the Rebellion of Upper Canada and other events.

David Spittal graduated form the University of Toronto and was employed by the Ontario Government between 1973 and 1987 completing archaeological inventory surveys and excavations in provincial parks, for housing developments and in advance of new highway construction.

David moved to the City of Toronto in 1987 and was involved in all aspects of the archaeology project at Fort York between 1987 and 2005 and was Director of the project from 1996 to 2005. He is now Staff Archaeologist and Project Coordinator for the Cultural Assets section of the Culture Division in the City of Toronto. This section has responsibility for the management and care of over 100 heritage buildings on 60 properties across the City. This includes archaeological planning as part of site development.


Wed., Apr. 2, 2008 6:30pm
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Potluck and Auction

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed Mar 5, 2008 7:30pm
“Historical Park on the Humber” by speaker from SHT

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

Le Sentier Partagé - The Shared Path: a historical park project along the Humber river by Lisette Mallet, Coordinator of Société d'histoire de Toronto

La Société d'histoire de Toronto was founded in 1984 during the time of Toronto's sesquicentennial celebrations, animated by the desire to tell Torontonians that the place they call home is a lot older than 150 years old.

The concept of taking our history telling outside came later through travels in other counties where the preservation of lieux de mémoire is alive and well and where there is less of a fixation on built heritage.

So much of Toronto's early history originated along the Humber River that it became clear that it would be the ideal location for a Historical park and that early history is so multi-layered that it couldn't tell the story of just one people. It had to be a shared path.

This presentation will guide you through the parks we plan to network physically, visually and virtually; the features we would like to enhance or create and some of the history we would like to highlight from south of St.Clair avenue all the way to the mouth of the Humber.

Lisette Mallet is Acadian, born in New-Brunswick and living in Toronto since 19980. Passionate about history, science, the arts and social justice she's been a member of la Société d'histoire de Toronto since 1994. Incorrigible volunteer she's also a member of the Humber Heritage Committee and the Etobicoke-York Heritage Roundtable. She was involved in the activities surrounding the designation of the Humber as a Heritage River. She has recently been appointed as the part-time coordinator to raise awareness of Toronto's history by means of a historical park. The rest of the time she spends as a nature interpreter at the new Centre for Urban Ecology at the Humber Arboretum.


Sat., Feb. 2, 2008 at noon
Potluck Lunch and
“The Butler's Rangers”
by Zig Misiak

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

"How the Butlers Rangers Interacted with the Six Nations Warriors during the American Revolution" by Zig Misiak

Zig will introduce the uniform of the Native liason officer that he portrays historically and how it fits with my modern day connection with the Six Nations. He will explain the relationship that the Rangers and Six Nations had during the American Revolution. Zig will describe role of warriors as they related to the Grand Council, and the things that they did during the war, some of which most people either find peculiar or just misunderstand them.

Zig will bring a banner, six feet in height, which shows him dressed in a rougher looking uniform which he will explain. In many ways the Rangers were mysterious and complex, and Mr. Misiak will explain some of the characteristics which made them seem so.

Zig Misiak has lived and breathed history for many decades. As a member of the Northern Brigade in Canada and the British Brigade in the U.S.A., his primary focus has been early Canadian history during the American Revolutionary war period 1775 to1784. Appointed Lieutenant Native Liaison Officer, this historically accurate position aligns with Zig,s keen interest in the history of the Hotinonshonni (Six Nations), and has taken him to re-enactments in historical forts all over Ontario, Nova Scotia, New York State, Connecticut, Ohio, and Virginia.

Zig spent many years on the Board of Directors for PineTree Native Centre and Kanata Village, has been awarded lifetime membership status for his contributions to the First Nations community. Zig is in continual communication with First Nations historians and elders due to an ongoing process of learning and dissertation.

Zig has been referenced in a number of history books, interviewed for history theses, and is often consulted relative to Six Nations' history. His Rangers participated in several documentaries such as CBC's A Peoples' History, CBC's Hockey: A Peoples History, The War of 1812 by the McKenna Brothers, The History of the Lincoln and Welland by Madua Studios and lately The History of Brant County and an Ontario Visual Heritage Project "Chatham-Kent" both by Pixel Dust Studios. More collaborative projects which are currently underway relate to the enhancement of Aboriginal history in the educational system.

Zig is currently restoring a century home in Brantford, where he lives with his wife and four children all of whom have reenacted with him. He is also adding to his earlier post secondary education by taking advantage of Wilfred Laurier's new home in Brantford. He is currently working on a degree in Contemporary History majoring in Native Studies. For more information, visit Zig's web site at www.realpeopleshistory.com.


Wed Jan 9, 2008 7:30pm
“History of Applewood Acres, Mississauga and Area” by David Cook

at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave.

“History of Applewood Acres, Mississauga and Area” by David Cook

Dave's interest in his home area evolved into his first book Apple Blossoms and Satellite Dishes about the evolution of Mississauga's first subdivision. A second historic volume, From Frozen Ponds to Beehive Glory: The Story of Dixie Arena Gardens followed and a third is now in the works, with a planned publication date of April 2008. Dave will draw upon all of these books as he mixes tales of the early history of the area with more recent events and personalities. As he researched, Dave uncovered some amazing twists and turns.

David Cook: When the family farm in Malton, where Dave grew up, was expropriated for Toronto Airport expansion in 1957, his family moved to Applewood Acres (Q.E.W. & Cawthra) where he attended school. He first worked for CHIC radio in Brampton and then for Toronto's CHIC. With experience as an on-air news announcer and in program production, Dave moved to the Mississauga News and then the Etobicoke Gazette. In 1980 he was elected Councillor, City of Mississauga and Regional Municipality of Peel, served three terms and retired in 1988. His most recent career is as an author of local history books.

2007 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed Dec 5, 2007 7:30pm
“Black History” by Dr. Rosemary Sadlier
at St. David's Church
49 Donlands Ave

"Black History" by Dr. Rosemary Sadlier

One of the many myths about Canadian history is the idea that the Loyalists were all of British origin! In this lecture, the intersection of Black history with Loyalist history will be discussed with specific reference to Nova Scotia and Ontario.

Dr. Rosemary Sadlier was born and raised in Toronto, and has a teaching degree and a graduate degree in social work. She has been president of the Ontario Black History Society since 1993, and was instrumental in making the celebration of Black History Month a national event in Canada. A noted author, her books work to highlight the historical contributions and experiences of Black people in Canada. Her much-praised titles include biographies of Harriet Tubman and Mary Ann Shadd and Leading the Way: Black Women in Toronto.


Wed Nov 7, 2007 7:30pm
“Taptoos and Piercing” by Ken Purvis

Taptoos and Piercing - "The hollow drum and shrill fife": The Military Taptoo during the Simcoe Regime - by Ken Purvis.

Using musical instruments and recorded musical examples, the various roles of Military music and musicians during the late 18th C. will be explored, with a particular focus on the development of the military taptoo. This presentation Taptoos and Piercing was first presented by Ken at the Munk Centre for International Studies in the spring of 2003 as part of a symposium on John Beckwith's operetta Taptoo! for which Ken fulfilled the role of historical music consultant. The same knowledge of the music of the era helped Ken in 2003, to recruit, train, rehearse and arrange the music for an authentic Napoleonic Military Band which performed for the Louisiana Purchase Bi-centennial in New Orleans.

Ken Purvis is the Senior Program Officer at Historic Fort York and has worked in public history for over 20 years. He began his career with the Fife and Drum Corps of the Fort Henry Guard in Kingston in the early 1980s and has continued to research, perform and record early music in a variety of forms and venues. He is the co-founder of the traditional music trio Gin Lane, and of The Regency Parlour Ensemble, both of which continue to entertain with their unique repertoire of early Ontario folk music.


Wed. Oct. 3, 2007
“Canadians at the Table”
by Dorothy Duncan

"Canadians at the Table: Food, Fellowship, and Folklore: A Culinary History of Canada" by Dorothy Duncan

Canadians at Table is an introduction to the diverse culinary history of Canada. We learn about the lessons of survival of the First Nations, the foods that fuelled the fur traders, and the adaptability of the early settlers in their new environment. As communities developed and transportation improved, waves of newcomers arrived, bringing their memories of foods, beverages, and traditions they had known, which were almost impossible to implement in their new homeland. They learned instead to use native plants for many of their needs. Community events and institutions developed to serve religious, social, and economic needs — from agricultural and temperance societies to Women's Institutes, from markets and fairs to community meals and celebrations.

One New World food, pemmican — a light, durable, and highly nourishing blend of dried and powdered buffalo, elk, or deer meat that is mixed with dried berries, packed into a leather bag, then sealed with grease — was introduced by the First Nations to the fur traders coming to Canada. Small amounts of pemmican replaced large amounts of regular food, freeing up precious hunting and food preparation time and allowing more space to carry additional furs and trade goods.

From the self-sufficient First Nations and early settlers, including the Loyalists, to the convenience foods of today, Canadians at Table gives us an overview of one of the most unique and fascinating food histories in the world and how it continues to change to serve Canadians from coast to coast.

Dorothy Duncan has addressed our branch on several occasions and often provided us with advice as well. She has always been involved with history in the form of museums, restorations and especially interpretation of the past. She has been curator of Black Creek Pioneer Village, and latterly Executive Director of OHS. Retired since Jan. of 2002, she is involved with Cuisine Canada and the Jane Austen Society. Dorothy has received the Order of Ontario, and an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from University of Waterloo. She is a Fellow of the Canadian Museum Association, and most recently was named Woman of the Year by the Toronto Women's Culinary Network.


Wed., May. 2, 2007
“Huguenot Ancestor”
by Linda Layton

"A Passion for Survival: The True Story of Marie Anne and Louis Payzant in Eighteenth-Century Nova Scotia," by Linda G. Layton

The lives of the author's ancestors have formed the stuff of legends and sparked the literary imagination of many writers, Margaret Atwood among them. (Atwood's short story, “The Bombardment Continues,” in the book “Story of a Nation: Defining Moments in Our History” was partially based on a previous work by Linda.) “A Passion for Survival” is the first documented account of Louis' tragic death and Marie Anne's unshakeable fortitude as they became engulfed in the French-English warfare in the New World. Mercenary Maliseet natives killed and scalped Louis and took Marie Anne and her children captive, just three years after they emigrated from France to Nova Scotia. The author spent eighteen years researching her Huguenot ancestors and has built this genealogical research into an historical narrative.

The author will take you through her research process, tell you how she wrote the book, and offer suggestions for blending your own genealogy into an historical framework.

Linda Layton is a twenty-seven-year Burlington resident who has worked at the Oakville Public Library for sixteen years. Although born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, she has deep Nova Scotia roots. As a young girl she often heard the story of her ancestors — the catalyst that sparked her interest in genealogy.


Wed., Apr. 4, 2007
Potluck and Auction
Montgomery Inn

Annual Potluck

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.


Wed., Mar. 7, 2007
The Sharon Temple,
with Jeanine Avigdor

St. David's Church, 49 Donlands Ave

"The Sharon Temple, David Willson and The Children of Peace", by Jeanine Avigdor

In the mid-19th century, a religious group in East Gwillimbury Township practised social welfare, educated their girls, established a farmers' co-operative, and built their unique "Temple of Peace", now a National Heritage Site. Jeanine Avigdor will introduce you to the Children of Peace and their charismatic leader, David Willson; and explain some of the symbolism built into the Sharon Temple.

Jeanine Avigdor is the editor of "The York Pioneer", the annual publication of the York Pioneer and Historical Society; and is an Honorary President of the Society. She is a retired secondary school English Department Head. On her maternal grandmother's side, she is descended from two Temple families, and from the Loyalist Travis family of New Brunswick and Queensville, Ontario.


Sat., Feb. 3, 2007 at noon
Loyalist Clothing & Fashion, 1776-1790.

St. David's Tower, 51 Donlands Ave

Loyalist Clothing Fashion during 1776-1790, with Diane Reid UE and Sarah Walker

Diane Reid (member of the Toronto Branch of the UEL) and Sarah Walker, owners of Fashion History Productions, began an association in February 1996. Both of them had a collection of a small number of historical costumes that they were eager to show on live models, to dynamically demonstrate women's clothing in the past.

In subsequent years they undertook to expand their collections of costumes to demonstrate clothing fashions throughout more historical periods to include accessories and undergarments, footwear, wigs and millinery and to include children's and men's wear.

Sarah is a costume maker and Diane does the research and history of the appropriate period. Their collaboration has produced themes that will specifically fit with a theme chosen by the organization's programme. Like the one this afternoon.

What constitutes Loyalist dress?

It is not the story of English or French Fashion, or even of high fashion. Rather it is the story of the adoption and adaptation of clothing styles in the years 1776-1790 before and just after the revolutionary war. How the revolutionary war affected what was worn.

With reproductions of garments during that period, get a hands on experience of the kinds of garments worn by men, women and children.

Also, a demonstration of dressing a lady, will be part of the program.


Tues., Jan. 9, 2007
Doug Grant on Mohawk Valley Bus Trip

“Tripping to the Mohawk Valley in 2006”, by Doug Grant U.E.

A goodly portion of the Loyalists originated in the City and Province of New York. George Anderson and Ed Kipp of the Sir Guy Carleton Branch in Ottawa have organized some nine trips, two for research and seven for bus loads of Loyalist descendants and historians to visit various key Revolutionary War sites along the Mohawk Valley, the Hudson Valley, Lake Champlain and their environs. The latest trip to the Mohawk was held Oct 1-4, 2006. Doug will show a collection of pictures taken during the trip, along with supplementary images, and commentary.

Doug Grant U.E. is a long-term member of the Gov. Simcoe Branch and has served many years on the Executive. He has two proven Loyalist ancestors and probably several more just needing research. He and spouse Nancy, who is also of Loyalist descent, have attended several bus trips organized by George and Ed to the areas in the Lake Champlain, Mohawk valley and Hudson Valley areas and both have ancestors who, as loyalists, were forced from that area. They both traveled much of Canada between 2004 and 2006 visiting branches of the Association and making many good friends when Doug was President of UELAC.

2006 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed., Dec. 6, 2006
Peter Johnson on Photography and Genealogy

"Early Photography And Genealogy" by Peter Johnson UE

A survey of the 19th Century Photographic formats you are most likely to find as you sift through old shoe boxes full of early family photos. Samples of the various types will be available for viewing, and please bring some of your own early photos for comment. From an interest in historical photography as a student, then teacher, Peter wrote several articles/columns on photography for the Loyalist Gazette during his several years as editor leading up to 2004.

Peter Johnson U.E. has at least 7 Loyalist ancestors, and 2 or 3 Rebels, just for variety.

He has been a reenactor since 1977 with the King's Royal Yorkers, serving as a musketman, but more often these days a fifer. He has been also involved in 1812 reenactment for the last five years.

A graduate of the University of Toronto, Hons. Fine Art & English, and MA in English, Peter recently retired from 30 years of teaching for the Toronto Board of Education. He is married to Angela who has also served the UELAC in various ways, and they have 4 kids, mostly adults now. Peter and Angela live on a piece of the 1801 family farm north of Trenton .


Sat., Nov. 4, 2006
Potluck luncheon, and
Tea with Mrs. Simcoe

"Potluck Luncheon, and "Tea with Mrs. Simcoe," by Marilyn Branch, Sue Hines and Cathy Thompson

Bring a pot (don't forget to put some food in it) and share with others as we enjoy a potluck lunch. The room opens at 12:45, lunch at 1:15.

Of course lunch is always a good precursor to tea. Mrs. Elizabeth Simcoe, wife of Governor Simcoe, will be making a special appearance. She will be taking tea and sharing with us, through her own words and with the assistance of a little 21 Century technology, music and slides depicting the Simcoe's life just before leaving England, the sea voyage, their time in Quebec and their life in the new province of Upper Canada.

Cathy Thompson of Grand River Branch will be our gracious Mrs. Simcoe and Marilyn Branch, also of Grand River Branch will provide the readings from the selections of Mrs. Simcoe's Diary. Sue Hines of Grand River, feeling somewhat like a member of Star Trek, will be beaming back and forth between the late 1700's and 2006, operating the electronic equipment that will help bring this bit of history to life.

Marilyn Branch is a Past President of Grand River Branch and a former Trustee of the UELAC. Four generations of her family have Loyalist status and all are members of Grand River Branch.
Sue Hines is Vice-President of the Grand River Branch and editor of their newsletter “Branches”. Cathy Thompson is the Genealogist for Grand River Branch and a participant in the Norfolk Historical Society which operates the Eva Brook Donly Museum, which has extensive archives and a great collection of Loyalist research material.


Wed., Oct. 4, 2006
Ron Fletcher on The Humber River

"The Humber: Tales of a Canadian Heritage River" by Ron Fletcher

In 1997 The Humber Watershed taskforce issues its report on implementing a strategy for a healthy Humber River. One of its objectives called for the identification and documentation of cultural and heritage resources. Other objectives called for the celebration of these resources.

This book is such a celebration. The Humber has been the scene of many stories down through human history. Along its banks explorers made grand plans for empires and forts were built to control it. Adventurers sought their fortunes and merchant princes built chateaux on the slopes of its valleys. Heroes and villains competed here.

Ron's book is a compilation of some fifty vignettes and sketches, all true. One such is “Governor Simcoe and the Toronto Carrying Place”.

Ron Fletcher is a retired history teacher who has lived all of his life in the Beaches and Riverdale. He published and spoke previously to us about his book "Over the Don". Ron is President of the Riverdale Historical Society.


Wed., May 3, 2006
Ken Purvis on the Founding of York

"Simcoe and Settlement: The Military Context of the Founding of York" by Ken Purvis

Ken's presentation will focus on the period following the American Revolution with the fledgling U.S. expanding into Indian territory in the Ohio valley and the implications for the defense of British North America. This would prove to be the first real test of the new Republic and would engender the formation of the U.S. Legion - an army raised specifically to conquer the "old Northwest". This horrific confrontation between the U.S. and native warriors of the so-called western tribes was a conflict in which the British were implicated, would come dangerously close to the Canada/U.S. border and ultimately would cause the establishment of Toronto.

Ken Purvis, the Senior Program Officer at Historic Fort York, has worked in public history for over 20 years - first with the St. Lawrence Parks Commission at Fort Henry, then with the Toronto Historical Board, now Culture Division, City of Toronto at Historic Fort York where he fulfilled the various roles of Historical Interpreter, Site Manager and now Senior Program Officer. He has lectured on the subject of Simcoe and Settlement at York University and for Routes to Learning Canada. His main area of interest is in Military Music and he has presented lecture/performances at dozens of museums and historic sites, at the Royal Canadian Military Institute and at the University of Toronto. Last year he had the pleasure of working with Dr. Carl Benn, Chief Curator for the City of Toronto, as co-curator of the music portion of an exhibit entitled The Soldiers' Trade which included an interactive touch-screen interface allowing visitors to hear recorded examples of 19th C. military music. He was a consultant for Canadian Composer John Beckwith on the creation of the score for the operetta Taptoo and presented a paper on the history of Military Taptoos at the Monk Centre for performing Arts as part of an all day symposium on Beckwith's work. In 2003 he had the pleasure of recruiting, training and writing scores for a French Napoleonic Military Band at the behest of the U.S. Dept. of the Interior, in order to participate in the 200th anniversary of the Louisiana Purchase in New Orleans.


Wed., Apr 5, 2006
Potluck and Auction

Annual Potluck

Our Spring potluck and auction at Montgomery Inn has been a fun activity each year for twenty years or more. It is a great opportunity to enjoy tasty food and good friends, some who can't make it out to our regular meetings. Perhaps you will win the door prize, or buy a ticket and take home one of the raffle prizes. Or buy that little item n the auction table — just the thing you always wanted.

Please mark this on your calendar and reserve your tickets by calling Robert Heath at 416-249-7981. We are limited to about 56 people so don't wait. Tickets are only $5.00, plus a food dish — when you speak with Robert, he will want to know if you are bringing a main course dish, salad or dessert. Don't delay, seating is limited!


Wed., Mar 1, 2006
Ron Brown on Main Streets

"Downtown Ontario: Unusual Main Streets to Explore" by Ron Brown

Many of Ontario's cities and towns were settled by truly innovative and sometimes wealthy and eccentric pioneers. They wanted their homes and communities to stand out and be noticed. And outstanding they are, whether it is because of the stunning architecture, the strange location or the intriguing story behind them. Some of the places thrived and grew, others eventually became little more than a main street, but all of the ones presented in this book have a fascinating story to tell.

Author, geographer and town planner, Ron Brown has long had a love affair with the landscape of Canada. From the time he visited his first ghost town in 1963, he began recording and writing about Canada's vanishing historic landscapes. Ron has published many books including Ghost Towns of Ontario, The Train Doesn't Stop Here Any More, Toronto's Lost Villages, and his most recent, Downtown Ontario. Ron has spoken to us previously, once on Canada's Railway Stations and more recently on "How Cobalt Became Ontario's Most Historic Town."


Sat., Feb 18, 2006
Heritage Day at Gov. Simcoe Branch

Heritage Day at Gov. Simcoe Branch

Our February meeting has been moved from Feb 1 to Feb 18. Please join us slightly before 1:00 pm so we can begin with our potluck lunch at 1:00. There is a great afternoon of activities and programs for all family members. Be sure to bring friends and relatives, but do let Daryl Currie (416-469-0851) know in advance how many are attending. Bring a dish and we will start off the afternoon with a lunch after a brief welcome.

During the afternoon we will have lots to do, including snackfoods with Dr. Dorothy Duncan, period music, flag and hat crafts, and Governor Simcoe's birthday cake. As a special part of the program, a guest re-enactor family from the Royal Yorkers -- Mum, Dad and two children -- will show us their clothing and gear and help transport us back into the period of our Loyalist ancestors.


Wed., Jan 11, 2006
Randy Barber on Sir Winston Churchill

"Sir Winston Churchill" by Randy Barber

This presentation on Churchill will basically cover the life and time's of Britain's greatest Englishman and I let him speak a lot using his humour, and his command of the English language. I call it "Churchill 101" as it provides the audience with quite a few little-known facts. I also try to explode some of the more common myths about him. I display a number of artifacts from my Churchilliana collection for folks to browse through before and after my talk. I always ask for questions.

Randy is a member of the Gov. Simcoe Branch, and resides in Markham. His very successful business career culminated in eight years as Chair of the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario. Politically, Randy served two terms as Councillor of Markham, and has been involved with fund raising, political and otherwise, including the Juno Beach Centre 2000-04. He has been President International Churchill Society — Canada, director International Board, The Churchill Centre — Washington, D.C, and chair 2005 International Conference of Churchill Societies — Quebec City. Among many personal interests, Randy is a collector of Sir Winston Churchill memorabilia.

2005 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Sat., Dec 3, 2005
Family lunch and "UELAC" by Doug Grant

"The State of the UELAC Dominion" by Doug Grant, UE

The UELAC has made significant strides once again in the last decade. Starting with the Vision statement of the Association, and a brief review of the current finances, the focus will be on five of the measurable objectives that the UELAC pursues. In 2005, increasing membership has been important. A number of initiatives have resulted in a 5% growth. Some of this growth has resulted from the interest generated by Branch Projects, which are being tackled across the country. Other memberships have come from attention the media have paid to Loyalist projects and events. A vastly increased use of email and the web, current communications tools, have in turn generated interest in membership and Loyalists from all over North America, and beyond. Doug will provide an opinion about the impact these approaches has made, and the programs and approaches which are in place or planned for 2006.

Douglas Warner Grant, UE, has proven Loyalist ancestors on both his maternal and paternal sides. A member of the Gov. Simcoe Branch since 1980, and of the executive team since 1982, Doug has held most executive positions including two stints as President. He joined the UELAC executive team as trustee and held several roles before being elected President in June 2004. In his role as Sr. VP and President, he has visited all but three of the 28 UELAC branches across the country.


Wed., Nov 2
John Warburton on Toronto Loyalists

"From Powder Horn to Plow: The Influence of the Loyalists in Toronto Township" by John Warburton, UE

The presentation outlines who the loyalists were, which ones came to Toronto Township (now Mississauga) and the influence that they, their children and grandchildren had on Mississauga. We will look at people such as Sir John Beverley Robinson, Thomas Merigold, Lewis Bradley, James Falconer, C.J.S. Bethune, William Claus, Frederick Starr Jarvis and a few others. We discuss first their relationship to the Revolutionary War, then their trials as they fled and finally the effect they had on early Toronto Township. This talk includes comments on Loyalist Burial Places and the Toronto Branch Project "The Home District Loyalists."

John was born in Paignton, Devon, England (not far from the final resting place of John Graves Simcoe) and came to Canada in 1953. Raised and educated in Toronto and Scarborough, he is a former school teacher in Scarborough. Historical interpreter with Black Creek Pioneer Village from 1989-1996, John is a freelance historian who performs at many venues across the Province as broom maker, farmer/rope maker and phrenologist as Dr. Zonk. John has contributed to books on Loyalist history in Toronto and has been an Executive member since 1990 of Toronto Branch — UELAC. He was Central West Region Vice-President UELAC 2002-4. John's Loyalist ancestors include: John Bradshaw, Isaac DeMille, John Walden Meyers, John Fetterly, Adam Pabst. (Looking for Cooks of Osnabruck (Cornwall) and John Fitzgerald of Adolphustown.)


Wed., Oct 5
Marion Heath on Cairns

"Stories From Stones" by Marion Heath

Stories from Stones is about cairns. They are build to honour and remember people or events. Such structures provide queries -- why were they built, are they still significant....? Neolithic and Bronze Age peoples made them. When the Israelites crossed the Jordan into the Promised Land, each tribe carried a stone from the river to pile on the shore as a significant reminder for their children. Our Ontario Ancestors also build them. Each chapter of this book tells the story with a photograph or two of one of these remarkable but little-known stone records of Ontario history.

Marion Heath holds a BA in English from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, a Master of Religious Education from Union Seminary, New York City; and a teacher's certificated from Toronto, where she taught for some years. Her works include The Competition in Russia, a story for Alberta Grade 9 studies, and articles on cairns and other monuments.


Wed., May 4
Ron Fletcher on East Toronto

"Over the Don" by Ron Fletcher

Today the area of Toronto on the east side of the lower Don River is close to the centre of our city. In the early years of York, it was on the outskirts of town with forests and then farms beside the Kingston Road. Ron Fletcher, a lifelong resident of this general part of Toronto, has written a book of vignettes, stories, incidents which occurred along the lower Don on or near the Queen St. Bridge. Ron will tell us about the book and some of the incidents from days before York, through Simcoe and Scadding, whose farm was nearby, to the mid-twentieth century.

Mr. Fletcher is a retired history teacher who has lived all of his life in the Beaches and Riverdale. He published this book "Over the Don" and is now working on a similar one about the Humber.


Wed., April 6
Potluck dinner at Montgomery Inn

Our potluck dinner, a long-time tradition at Montgomery Inn, gives time to meet and discuss while enjoying a wonderful meal. A door prize, a raffle, and an auction fill out this event. Entrance is by ticket - $5.00 per person - an item for the auction and contribution of a dish for dinner. Casual dress. Free parking on-site at the southeast corner of Islington and Dundas in Etobicoke. This dinner has been known to sell out, so order your tickets early.


Wed., March 2
Rev. Harold Shepherd on Rev. John Stuart

"Rev. John Stuart" by Rev. Harold Shepherd

John Stuart was born 1740/1 in Pennsylvania where he was raised. He earned a B.A. from U. of Pennsylvania in 1763, worked as a schoolmaster in Lancaster County before taking his M.A. in 1770. His intellectual and social skills matched his height which exceeded six feet. In 1770, following a trip to England for his ordination, he was posted to Fort Hunter, where he ministered to the Indians and Europeans. He met Joseph Brant, Thayendanegea, and the two collaborated in the translation of St. Mark's gospel into Mohawk. Stuart supervised a school at Johnstown and officiated at the burial of friend and protector Sir Wm. Johnson.

Loyal to the King, Stuart eventually escaped, through an exchange, to Montreal in 1781 where he lived and worked for four years, and among other responsibilities was chaplain to the KRRNY. In 1784 he traveled to Niagara, and administered to loyalist settlers along the way.

In 1785, Stuart moved to Cataraqui (Kingston) where he lived until his death in 1811. In 1792 after the Legislative Council was sworn in at St. George's Church, Kingston, Simcoe was appointed Chaplain of the Council. While busy with the ministerial duties, Stuart was very involved with his family of eight children. John Strachan called John Stuart the Father of the Episcopal Church in Upper Canada. His life story is quite fascinating.

Rev. Shepherd is Rector of St. David's Anglican Church, where we hold our monthly meetings. He hosted our Loyalist Day Church Service in 2003. Born in Toronto, Harold's family moved to Montreal when he was in early grade school. He graduated there from McGill, and entered Osgoode Law School in Toronto. Ordained a Deacon in 1981 and a Priest in the Diocese of Montreal in 1982, Harold returned for more education at Queen's University in 1989 and while there was Honorary Assistant to St. George's Cathedral until 1992. He practiced law in Oakville, and returned to Toronto in 1994 as Rector at St. David's. He is also employed by the Federal Government in the Dept. of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, determining applications for refugee protection to be presented to the Minister. Rev. Shepherd has participated in many of our Branch events.


Wed., February 2
Jane Beecroft on Davenport Rd. and Old Yorkville

"Some Deep History - Davenport Rd and old Yorkville" by Jane Beecroft

Before the first European settlements as York by Simcoe in 1793 and by the French as Fort Rouille from the 1750's, the First Nations peoples had used this area. A Iroquois Village, Teiaigon, by the Humber, connected to an old trail which became Davenport Road. One can only wonder if Simcoe himself walked or rode parts of this road.

This "oldest road in the region" is the base for this presentation. As traffic increased, a tolling system evolved. The Tollkeepers Cottage, an historic landmark, has been returned to the corner of Davenport and Bathurst, near its original location. The cottage is two thirds restored, under the auspices of the Community History Project. Our speaker will describe the tolling system and the restoration status and plans for the cottage.

A little further east, the second oldest community in this region, Yorkville, was founded in 1808. In 1853 it was incorporated as a municipality and annexed to Toronto in 1883. Jane has been involved with many aspects of Yorkville for years and will discuss some of its history and progress.

President of the Community History Project (CHP), and founder of the CHP and Society of Heritage Associates, Jane received the Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship in 2001, which noted that she has devoted nearly 25 years to issues of heritage building, natural heritage and to Ontario's First Nations' people. As a director of the Toronto Historical Association, Jane has spearheaded the study of 250 lost historical sites in Toronto. Through the CHP, she conducts numerous historical walking tours through Yorkville and South Rosedale. Jane has been a great force in the effort to preserve the Bloor-Yorkville neighbourhood and has documented much of its history. Her great love of history led to a project to provide books to native libraries in Ontario. Jane has also received the City of Toronto Award of Merit. She has led the charge to save and restore the Tollkeepers cottage. This full-time involvement with heritage follows several careers in the arts fields.


Wed., January 12
David Beasley on Maj. John Richardson

"First Novelist rallies Loyalism in Canada" by Dr. David Beasley

Major John Richardson was born in Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) in 1796, went to school in British-run Detroit and Amherstburg until the War of 1812 claimed him as a boy soldier. Later he wrote the first version of the War from a Canadian viewpoint. As an officer in the West Indies and a half-pay officer in England and the Continent he experienced much which he used in his fiction. After fighting in the Spanish Carlist War, he returned to Canada as correspondent for the London Times, supported Lord Durham and the quest for Responsible Government, edited several newspapers, continued to publish novels and non-fiction, and migrated after the Rebellion Losses Bill to New York City to publish several novels. His novel Wacousta, about Pontiac's siege of Fort Detroit in 1763, published in England in 1832, was reissued over twenty times. He died as a result of penury in 1852. While in Canada he rebuilt the spirit of loyalism politically through his journalism and began the formation of what became the Conservative Party. His Eight Years in Canada is a valuable record of the political turmoil in Canada in the 1840s.

Dr. David Beasley was born and raised in Hamilton, Ontario. After graduating from McMaster University, he worked, traveled, studied and wrote in Europe for five years. This included a year reading French literature at the Sorbonne in Paris, two years of teaching in Vienna and traveling in a remote region of Turkey by donkey. He came to New York City and married a lady who worked at the United Nations. He obtained his MLS from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, worked as a research librarian in the New York Public Research Libraries, organized and was president of AFSCME Local 1930, obtained his PhD in political-economics and continued to write. In 1992 he returned to Canada and has been living in Simcoe where he is writing and publishing. The Canadian Don Quixote; the life and works of Major John Richardson, Canada's first novelist was his first book publication. Out of print for many years, he revised it and published it recently. He has also published recently four of Richardson's novels that have not been seen by Canadians.

2004 Governor Simcoe Branch Meetings

Wed., December 1
Fred Hayward on his Loyalist ancestor

"Loyalists, Outreach and You" by Fred H. Hayward UE

This presentation will include an overview of the work of UELAC Education/Outreach Committee, blended with ideas for both personal and Branch outreach and served up with visuals, artifacts and dramatization. Fred's impersonation of his Irish Palatine ancestor, Philip Embury, considered to be the founder of the Methodist Church in the United States, should be both entertaining and informative.

Since he joined the Hamilton Branch UELAC in 1998, Fred H. Hayward UE has filled his "retirement" years with a variety of roles within the organization. In Hamilton, he has served as chairman of both the Education Committee and the Archives Committee and presently is the immediate Past President of the Branch. At the Dominion level, he has served as the Chairman of the Education/Outreach Committee since 2000 and was recently elected as Regional Vice President of the Central West Region UELAC. He also has found time to address a number of heritage groups and UELAC Branches. With classroom experience at both the elementary and secondary levels, Fred has degrees from both McMaster and University of Toronto. Fred feels that his strong interest in Gardening, the Arts, Canadian History and his extended Family has had a great influence in his approach to the needs of our Association.


Wed., November 3
Dorothy Duncan on Heritage Cooking and Christmas recipes

"Preparing for Christmas in Early Ontario" by Dorothy Duncan

Dorothy's presentation will focus on food, but will also deal with gifts and decorations for house and table. The food portion will review ingredients and recipes our ancestors might have used in the early nineteenth century. Dorothy will bring some samples which she will have made from the recipes for us to enjoy. She recently authoured a book, "Nothing More Comforting: Canada's Heritage Food" (published by Dundurn Press, hardcover, 25 pages). It is mostly a history book, but does contain some recipes. Dorothy will have copies of the book for sale at the meeting at a special price of $25. She will also bring a basket of items made from the book's recipes; buying a book will earn you a ticket for the raffle to win the basket.

Dorothy Duncan has addressed our branch on several occasions and often provided us with advice as well. She has always been involved with history in the form of museums, restorations and especially interpretation of the past. She has been curator of Black Creek Pioneer Village, and latterly Executive Director of OHS. Retired since Jan. of 2002, she is involved with Cuisine Canada and the Jane Austen Society. Dorothy has received the Order of Ontario, and an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from University of Waterloo. She is a Fellow of the Canadian Museum Association, and most recently was named Woman of the Year by the Toronto Women's Culinary Network.


Wed., October 6
David Scott on Law in Upper Canada

"Law in Early Ontario" by David Scott

David spoke to us this past January about the national, political and legal environment in Canada through the eighteenth century, and an introduction to the early nineteenth century. This presentation will follow from that one. Upper Canada was formed by an Act of the British Parliament in 1791. John Graves Simcoe was appointed the first Lieutenant Governor. One of the institutions implemented was the legal system, and our speaker will address the evolution from 1791 through 1900, with a focus on the period of Upper Canada. During this time the organization of the courts changed as the population grew dramatically. Osgoode Hall was formed and likewise changed. Take a look with us at life behind the scenes as we peek at the diaries of an early Chief Justice, Robert Harrison. At the same time that the system evolved, the public and general view of criminality has also changed. A fascinating part of our heritage that we don't often think about.

David was born in Beamsville, but most of his public schooling was in Ottawa. He attended Macdonald College, McGill University where he earned a degree in Science. He worked for the Defense Research Board in Kingston, Glaxo Smith Klein in Montreal and a legal firm in Ottawa before entering Law School at Osgoode Hall in 1955. He was called to the Bar in 1959, and after several years working for various firms, joined the Federal Dept. Of Justice in 1968 in Toronto. David was appointed to the Bench in 1979. In 1998 he retired from full time judgeship, but then continued part time until his complete retirement in 2002.